Skill Project Links and Text

Tactu

[09] Warrior
I'm archiving this data here now that I know we can get it from the way back machine ( Thank you DaPowerHouse!!!! ). I'm starting with Maxi and working my way back to Kilik.

Video -

Notes:
Skill Project Breakdown


Sequence 1: Versus Taki
Command:
6bAA, Left Step, B2, Left Step, 8WR Left A, 8WR Left A, 8WR Left A, B->RO, RO A
What Happens:


While landing B2 on the side is rare, it could happen should your opponent whiff something of any scale. Like Taki’s PO B, this can set up a BT wake-up with a left Step. Even rarer is an opening large enough to land 8WR Left A on the back, however, should it occur, with perfect 8WRB timing, you could link up to six of them before the angle allows the opponent to block. Three of these, a 236K, and a decent follow through usually spells death, so the total number hardly matters. When the hits in 236K skip just before the final hit, B->RO, RO A based combos are possible.
Notes:


The combo featured here was enough to kill and works best on smaller characters. If you want to avoid the rare 236K hit skip, simply do four 8WRB Left As and then combo with a normal 236K. Either way, if 8WR Left A hits on your opponents back, it could signal the end of the round.



Sequence 2: Versus Mitsurugi
Command:
2A, RCC 2KK, 8WRB Left KK, 2aB->LI, LI PSL1->LO, LO A, 8WRB Left A, AA->RC, RC A
What Happens:


Maxi uses 2A to interrupt the second hit of Mitsurugi’s 8WR 1_7BA. Without question, Maxi has the best overall 2A in Soul Calibur. The proceeding RCC 2KK and 8WRB Right KK are applicable as both are relatively safe if blocked and keep the opponent pressured up close. If the second hit of 8WR Right KK hits independently, you can combo through with 2aB->LI for optimum damage. From here, Maxi shifts to LO and pressures with LO A. Tag on an 8WRB Left A, followed by an AA->RC, RC A and you have a solid lockdown string.
Notes:


LO A is extremely safe if blocked and if you apply LO AK enough, opponents will stop trying to attack after blocking LO A. This opens to the door for LO A->throw, LO A->FC games, LO A->8WRB games, and LO A->RCC mix-ups. 8WR Left A is easily one of his most important moves, however its delayed impact and semi-lateral approach make if very difficult to apply. The risk to reward factor associated with this attack is great, you have a move that does a fifty percent combo on counter hit or gives a bs+2 on block. I strongly feel every Maxi player should look into applying this move and search of creative and effective ways to do so.



Sequence 3: Versus Sophitia
Command:
4B+K, iFC A+B->LI, LI bG->RO, RO KK, 2aB->LI, LI bG->RO, RO BBK
What Happens:


I am not going to detail the ins and outs here. It should be fairly obvious.
Notes:


I added this series for two reasons. One was to further highlight and expand on the power of the 2aB->LI combo follow-through, since this attack ends in a stance, you can quickly shift it to stances with ample wake-up attacks. This is demonstrated here. The second reason was to point out the vulnerability of the LO BK and RO BBK. Early Maxi players tend to abuse these moves, if their opponent blocks they are at an advantage the moves themselves deal a heavy dose of damage, have solid range, and track well. There is nothing weak about them; expect the final kick. Every character in SC has a means to counter the final kick, below I have detailed all of them.

Kilik/Mina: 2A, 4kB
Xianghua: 4A, 3B+K
Hwang: 3B (to combos)
Sophitia: 3A+B, 66B (to combos), A+B
Lizardman: 66B (to combos) (due to his size, 3A+B will not work)
Astaroth/Rock: FC 3K
Nightmare: WS K
Taki: 3B (to combos)
Ivy: 3B (to combos), 1K
Mitsurugi: FC 1B (to combos), WS A+B (to combos)
Yoshimitsu: FC 3K (to combos)
Voldo: 214G+B (side throw)
Maxi: 1B (floats), 2aB->LI
Cervantes: A+K, B2 (non-shift), 3A+B (non-CH), 3A (non-CH)

So, for those frequently abused by RO BBK and LO BK, now you have the means to do something about it.



Sequence 4: Versus Cervantes
Command:
AA->RC, RC PSL3->LI, LI B->BL, BL PSL1->RC, RC PSL3->LI, LI B->BL, BL K, 2KK, RCC A, 66B+K
What Happens:


RC is shifted to LI B to evade Cervantes’ 3B. From here, LI B is shifted to return to LI and pressure with a second LI B. LI B is very safe if blocked and tends to evade B attacks well. This pressure series sets-up one of Maxi’s rarest combos.
Notes:


While this series may not be as practical as most, it does still have merit. AA is a potent attack for Maxi, however when blocked all RC attacks can be silenced with 3Bs. If you opponent mindlessly sticks out 3Bs or Bs, you can counter by using PSL2 and shifting to BL A or BL KK, however if they are actually waiting and looking for the RC attacks, you have a difficult problem. The LI shift can trick them and LI B can easily evade vertical attacks. By balancing your attacks from AA->RC, you can keep you opponent confused to make all of them effective. So use RC A to counter 2As and back dashes, RC KK to counter AAs, RO based attacks for pressure; such as RO BB, BL attacks for safety; such as BL A, and finally, LI attacks to counter 3Bs. Using anyone element too much makes all of them useless. The final combo on display is guaranteed due to the proximity to the ground, however landing the second hit of 2KK on CH is extremely rare.



Sequence 5: Versus Sophitia
Command:
3B, B->RO, RO PSL1->BL, BL K, A+K->LI, LI bG->RO, RO A->BL, BL PSL2->RO, RO A->BL, BL G, WL K, 44K, 3A+K
What Happens:


Maxi has nothing of value guaranteed after a deep 3B, thus it is wise to use a simple B and attempt various stance-related wake-ups. By itself, the first hit of BL K is always safe, Maxi hops back and clears himself of any danger. This taunt-like hop often provokes foolish retaliation, A+K can be an effective and stylish means to counter. Having been fully evaded by an A+K, most players will brain-freeze, this opportunity can be applied to shift from the mediocre LI based attacks to venerable RO based attacks. From here, the ever-useful double RO A shift is demonstrated. The best means to counter annoying RO based attacks is a simple 2A, this is anticipated with WL K.
Notes:


Arguably, the WL K, 44K combo is a weak option in this case, however if you pay careful attention you will see how far the 44K projects and that it allowed the opponent to unintentionally land on their feet. 44K can only be used in a combo after WL K or RO K[K]/kB[K], so this combo is rare enough that few will know about its strange properties. Since they will usually unintentionally land on their feet the best means to punish them is 3A+K, dash in throw, or 66K lockdown.



Sequence 6: Versus Ivy
Command:
GI, bG, iFC 1AB->LO, LO B->RC, RC PSL1->RO, RO K[K], 4A+B, 66B+K
What Happens:


When it connects on counter hit, FC 1AB->LO, LO B is a guaranteed combo. Since this ends in a stance with the opponent near you and downed, it presents a valuable wake-up opportunity. From here, Maxi shifts to RO K[K] to lock Ivy down and combos with 4A+B, 66B+K.
Notes:


Beyond the RO K[K] this series lacks practicality, the reality here is that while the rewards are high; distant ROs and strong combos, 4A+B is more of a liability than an asset. 4A+B CH, to 66B+K is a little known combo and should be favored over the simple 4A+B CH, Slide combo.



Sequence 7: Versus S.Mina
Command:
AA->RC, 8WRB Left A, 2A, FC 3AA->RO, RO A[K], 66K, 3b+kB->RO, RO BBK
What Happens:


The spacing associated with AA->RC forces the opponent to either back dash, and risk bCH, or block an 8WR Left A. From here, Mina has no means to beat a 2A, and if that hits no means to beat a FC 3AA->RO. For characters with short-ranged As, FC 3AA->RO can present a problem if Maxi goes to RO AK. The side step RO A provides is enough to keep this lockdown series going. With the block stun the RO A[K] established, 66K must be blocked, D-Stepped, or crouched under, either way this is very difficult to avoid. With the spacing 66K provides, it is also hard to beat 3b+kB->RO, from here the RO BBK provides the final ounce of lockdown.
Notes:


This is pure Maxi lockdown. While there are means out of this trap, they would require a great deal of anticipation. Over anticipating a character that can shift any attack into three or more stance based attacks or into three different stances can spell doom. So regardless of the final out come, this series plays right into Maxi’s hands. Four blocked attacks in this series provided positive advantages, 8WR Left A with bs+2, RO A[K] with bs+10, 66K with bs+1, and RO BBK with a mere bs-1. Understanding these hit and block advantages is integral to winning with Maxi, not only must one understand what tools to use with Maxi, but also understand the tools available to their opponent and counter appropriately. It is also foolish to limit yourself to a handful of counters, Maxi’s 2A is an ever-venerable option, however Maxi has a wide repertoire of attacks that evade or even simple Stepping can provide better terrain advantages. Committing to one set of follow-throughs means your opponent sees one set of follow-throughs, which is a sad case for a character with infinite potential.



Sequence 8: Versus LizardMan
Command:
4B->LO, LO K, [G]9B->LO, LO BK, 2A, 6bAA, 2A, 8WRB 3K, A+B
What Happens:


4B->LO, LO K is useful in moderation, when the LO K hits Maxi is at hs+1 and when it is blocked, he is at a mere bs-9. Any low attack that is bs-11 or less cannot be punished by retaliatory low or WS attacks. This means that if you anticipate your opponent’s retaliation, you can either Step around the WS attacks or jump over the low attacks. In this case, [G]9B is applied. Unlike FC 1B->LO, LO B, after [G]9B->LO, LO B will not combo, however if they tech roll they are forced to eat or block the K of LO BK. Maxi’s 6bAA is a lot safer than it seems and this almost always makes opponents suck up a 2A. 6bAA leaves Maxi at a mere bs-3. 8WR 3_9K is yet another deceptive move in terms of block stun, Maxi is left at a mere bs-5, however the opponent is always pushed too far out to counter with anything of value.
Notes:


Maxi’s elbows tend to be over-looked and often forsaken by most Maxi players. The reason being that due to the weight systems in Soul Calibur, many characters will not be forced to block both elbows. While conditional, it is not random, so study and experience will yield full understanding. Primarily, Maxi should avoid using them on heavier characters straight on. Despite the flaw, there is a fail-safe, the final B can be delayed, so much so that is can come out as late as 6bAA>B or 6bAA, 2aB->LI. These too look identical, however, after they block 2aB->LI, they are forced to block LI A.

Overall, this series was designed to demonstrate several tools in action. I would never suggest using this string en masse, but bits and pieces of it have merit and can be interchanged with other items throughout this project.



Sequence 9: Versus Sophitia
Command:
1B, B2, bG, iFC 1AB>LO, LO B->RC, RC PSL3->LI, LI aA->RC, RC A
What Happens:


1B evades high attacks as well as Xianghua’s 4A, this is another attack many Maxi players fail to use to its potential. From here, B2 is applied to keep Sophitia from back dashing. The bG fake is used to draw a GI after the forced crouch state of B2. The rest of this sequence is applicable lockdown theory. If they manage to block the second hit of the FC 1AB->LO, they cannot counter due to the range and speed of LO B. If LO B hits, shifting to LI is relatively safe and easily allows for the fast LI aA->RC. Due to the forced axis block on LI aA->RC, Stepping to avoid RC A is extremely difficult.
Notes:


This sequence is really a tool to highlight 1B. I cannot say enough positive things about 1B and given the often AA happy nature of many players, this attack should be used whenever you anticipate an attack from your opponent. 1B is i14, hs0, bs-11, therefore it is fast and safe in every regard.



Sequence 10: Versus Xianghua
Command:
AA->RC, RC G, 2B, FC 3A->RO, RO B->RC, RC PSL1->RO, RO A->BL, BL G, 2A, RCC 3A+K
What Happens:


While you would never see this sequence used in whole, just about every advanced Maxi player has used bits and piece of it as required. Maxi pokes with AA, and goes straight into 2B, this can be useful to counter high attacks and end in a crouched state. FC 3A->RO is used to advance, pressure, and link to RO. RO B->RC is shifted back into RO so Maxi can use the speed and subtle step of RO A. From here, 2A CH to RCC 3A+K rounds out the sequence.
Notes:


Not only does Maxi have 1B to counter high attacks, he also has 2B. 1B keeps him standing, 2B ends in a crouched state. 2B is i13, hs+3, bs-6, this makes it completely safe, yet slightly more vulnerable to Steps that 1B. While Maxi has a poor WS game, he does have a very strong RCC, 8WRB, and FC game. Given the overall strength of his 2A, one should master RCC and 8WRB to the fullest to capitalize on the 2A’s prowess.



Sequence 11: Versus Mitsurugi
Command:
4AbAA, 3B, bG, 66K, 4B->LO, LO B->RC, RC PSL2->BL, BL A, 6B4->LI
What Happens:


4AbAA is used to lock Mitsurugi down; the final hit connects on CH and induces uDOS. The 3B, bG, 66K demonstrates a rarer form of back turned set-up every character can apply; the attack proximity class. Previous Skill Projects highlighted the common and easy to apply positional proximity class, these work because of the half-down state found in Soul Calibur. Attack proximity works because the hit area of the attack goes on the opposite side fooling the system into believing the attacking character is on the opposite side. With the logic spoiled, the game rises the downed character into a back turned state. Afterwards, 4B->LO, B is used to deal damage. This is then linked to BL A for safety and evasion.
Notes:


Attack proximity wake-ups work best for Astaroth and Nightmare; for example, Astaroth can do G+B4, whiffing [G]9K. For Maxi, this really is not an important enough tool to matter, however I felt this would be an appropriate time to introduce it. By itself, the rest of the sequence is something I use often, due to the way it steps backwards, a whiffed BL A often provokes the opponent to rush it, and 6B4 dispels any such efforts easily.



Sequence 12: Versus Xianghua
Command:
G+B, 2A, RCC B->RO, RO PSL1->BL, BL G, 3A, 236K, 3B
What Happens:


As shown in the Kilik Skill Project, any move that leaves the opponent head up and head towards leaves them vulnerable to back turned set-ups if their waking attack is interrupted. After getting up backwards, Xianghua is naturally going to be a little hesitant when she should not be, B->RO, RO PSL1->BL, BL G, 3A takes full advantage of this.
Notes:


B->RO, RO PSL1->BL is more useful than it may initially seem. As you condition your opponent with B->RO, RO A attacks, RO BB mix-ups, or RO K attacks they will eventually pause when they see B->RO. Typically, to keep the mix-up potent, one wants the reward for it to be minor. Granted, using a dangerous and intricate set-up to garner a small reward seems foolish, however if you go out of your way to deal massive damage you will reverse the conditioning that enabled the small reward. Ten small rewards are greater than one large one. Often I use the BL A whiff to 6B4 set-up here, but I will also use BL G to 8WRB, basic attacks; such as AA, throws, or use PSL3->LO for a sudden; and often CH, LO BK.



Sequence 13: Versus Astaroth
Command:
Left D-Step, Right Side Throw->BL, BL PSL1->RC, RC KK, 66bG->RC, 8WRB Left A, AA RC, RC G, 66K
What Happens:


The D-Step here is actually more than meets the eye, not only do you have to D-Step to avoid the Bull Rush, but you have to cancel that into a forward dash and then pause so Astaroth rises out of the crouched state of the attack. Point being, if you ever evade a Bull Rush, just BB Astaroth, it is infinitely easier. Leaving the Dragon’s Nest is easily Maxi’s best throw, just due to the rarity of it, details on its application have never been covered. This throw ends in BL, if the opponent tries to resist at all, BL KK will counter everything they do. Typically, they will try to stand up or roll away, PSL1 shifts to RC and RC KK will scoop them up for an easy combo. If abusing these two low attacks has taught your opponent to rise blocking low, the PSL2 shifts to RO and RO KK will combo for even more damage. Finally, if you are just looking for random variety, PSL3 ends in LO and LO BK will combo on CH if they resist. There is a subtle trend at work here, the first hit of all four of these options also hits downed opponents, so bottom line here: they are taking more damage no matter what they do. More often than not, I favor the RC KK option, even when blocked it is safe. If your opponent does not know how to AC out of it, RC KK, 66B+K combos, however if they do, RC KK, to 66bG->RC can be a valuable fake. This fake is applied to force Astaroth to block an 8WR Left A, from here, he eats the AA->RC, and RC is canceled into a 66K.
Notes:


I like this sequence because it really does work and demonstrates how dangerous Maxi can be against waking opponents. Throughout this series, even Astaroth’s best resistance is futile and we see more Maxi lockdown at its finest.



Sequence 14: Versus LizardMan
Command:
4B->LO, LO PSL2->LI, LI K, 66bG->RC, RC PSL3->LI, LI K, B+KBBBBA
What Happens:


Since this sequence is just in place to show the LI K CH, B+KBBBBA combo there is no need to explain the intricacies of it.
Notes:


As stated before, 4B->LO is extremely valuable and often provokes a LI K CH. Just for sake of demonstration, I showed 66bG->RC, RC PSL3->LI, LI K CH afterwards. I do not suggest this. While I did not land the combo deep, normally LI K CH will guarantee a full B+KBBBBA for massive damage. This is roughly 110 points, which is more than even G-Stepping to get a back throw set-up.



Sequence 15: Versus Voldo
Command:
66K, B->RO, RO A[K], 3B, 2aB->LI, LI PSL2->RC, RC A, Left D-Step, G+B_A
What Happens:


Voldo is first pinned down with a 66K. Given Voldo’s overall speed, he is forced to block a B->RO. From here, Maxi keeps the pressure on with RO A[K]. Once blocked, RO A[K] forced the opponent to block 3B. The 3B hits shallow, so Maxi has more time to combo with 2aB->LI. Once this connects, PSL2 is applied to link to RC A. RC A induced forced crouch state and most WS attacks can be easily D-Stepped.
Notes:


I could never sing the praises of RC A enough, it covers a with berth, does solid damage, induces forced crouch state, and offers value options for the K in RO BBK and LO BK. Learning to apply RC A should be one of the first lessons any aspiring Maxi player sets out to do.



Sequence 16: Versus Taki
Command:
Soul Charge, 4AbAA, 236K, B->RO, RO A->BL, BL A
Notes:


This is a guaranteed combo, however only under the circumstances shown; the character must be in the corner, Maxi must be Soul Charged, and the character must be in the female class. This combo does between 233 and 237 total damage, Soul Calibur has a 240 life bar, this means one more peck of any kind and Taki is dead. The only area of shock here is that B->RO, RO A->BL, BL A actually combos. While rare, it is true. B is +17 into RO, RO A is i14, RO A is +19 into BL, BL A is i15, the reason this combo is so little known is because of how much positioning is actually required for it to connect.






Additional Information


Musical Score:

Artist : Orbital
Song Title : Mission Impossible Theme (Orbital Remix)
Albums : Middle of Nowhere, The All Together, Insides, etc.

The Maxi SP went through more music deviations than any other and eventually I settled on "Got Your Money" by Old Dirty Bastard. Big pimping is pure Maxi, and I went as far as to plot story boards for the SP. Evidence of this can be found laced through out the SP, the original goal was to have it on female characters to further enhance the music. This was not to be however and Mission Impossible became the track. I rested on Mission Impossible largely because it suited the nature of the character and the difficulty of explaining the character in a mere three-minute video. There is so much more that composes Maxi and so much of it is evolutionary and based on the opponent’s understanding of the character. The Maxi SP does not scratch the surface of the character; it simply cannot. However, it does provide insight and some overlooked details that I feel will help players learning Maxi.

If you like this song you may like other tracks from Orbital, leeching .mp3 files is certainly convenient, however people should do their utmost to support music they enjoy so the artist can continue to produce music. That and .mp3 files compress the high-end treble and bass essentially cutting out chunks of the music, though few people own audio equipment fine enough to discern the subtle differences.

Check out Orbital’s other albums or sample tunes from Middle of Nowhere at www.cdnow.com.



Creation and Production:


Since I was already widely over budget on time and this download is a monster, I decided to cut the ending credits. This is a sad choice since I put a lot of time and effort into rendering them and they are far more stylish than any previous credits.

Gameplay:
WCMaxi
Vintoks

Assistance:
elk
Nuts
Srayer
RVD240
Vintoks

Special Thanks:
Ai-Uchi
FetZ
Fhwang Sung Kyung
hprx

Unlike previous efforts, this piece was composed largely in Adobe After Effects and Adobe Illustrator. I used Adobe Premiere to edit down the source material and to create the black and white pauses (using exported stills into Photoshop). Adobe Illustrator helped coordinate the bulk of the math involved and create the sixty-one masks applied. Masking and layering made the motion possible, Adobe After Effects, blood, sweat, tears handled all this, and a whole lot of crying as my PC crashed all too often. I think the scale of this labor can been seen in the raw number of files involved; one hundred thirty-eight, and the number of Adobe After Effects layers involved; sixty-five. There are many points I am not personally satisfied with, but getting this done in a timely manner meant a lot.

Video was captured in Windows 98 Second Edition on a Pinnacle Systems DC 30 Plus using the cards proprietary software, the source samples were then trimmed down in Adobe Premier then eventually synchronized and composed using Adobe Premier and Adobe After Effects. Audio was attained from the source CD via Music Match Jukebox. All in all, to complete this project a total of one hundred thirty-either files consisting of over 2.7 gigabytes were used. The final .avi file was then encoded to .mpg file using Ligos Suite 2.0 and to DIVX format using FlasK MPEG and the DIVX 4.0 codec.
 

heiligekuh

[08] Mercenary
Thanks for posting this vids and the write-ups. More importantly, thanks for reminding me that I can just go read the old GI site via the WayBack machine. GI was my first game forum and the quality of the writing and discussion there was first rate.

I played (ie, got schooled by) WCM, Binkley and many others from those days and still enjoy the hell out of SC. The lack of netplay in the XBLA release is such a crime.
 

Tactu

[09] Warrior
Video -

Sequence 1: Versus Maxi
Command:
6B, 214B, 3A+KA~214->WP, WP B+K
What Happens:


6B followed by 214B is considerably safe. Given the distance, following with 3A+KA is almost impossible to punish even when both hits are blocked or GIed. Personally, I find Srayer’s Whip Buffering guide to be an invaluable piece, it opens doors for Whip based combos and post-GI tactics. In this case, Whip buffer is applied to safely force the opponent into long range.
Notes:


Even though the opponent blocked the WP B+K, typically they do not. I strongly believe all Ivy users should look the power of the WP B+K to further their game.



Sequence 2: Versus Mitsurugi
Command:
6K, 66A, 8WR 2B, 4bA
What Happens:


When 6K connects, it is near visceral to pursue with 66A. However, this can be snuffed with a fast 2A. From here, Mitsu RCCs to 2KB. I showed the Step out of the 2KB to show that you can actually get a free back throw when you block the 2K and Step around the B. Not only is Mitsu at a severe block disadvantage, but he’s also at risk to back throws or other brutality. Few people know Ivy’s 4bA will hit ground opponents, much less understand how effective it can be to prevent rolling. Once this connects, vary the charge length on the to pin your opponent down.
Notes:


The 4bA is actually more effective as a wake-up than one may initially perceive. Not only does it hit grounded opponents, it also can GI wake-up attacks and set-up the Summon Suffering.



Back Throw (BT) Series:

As stated in the Kilik project, wake-ups are far more important in SC than combos are. Each project will highlight potential means to wake in the opponent into a back turned state. I would have further highlighted this theory with Kilik, but he lacks the set-ups and stuns required to demonstrate this fundamental.

Typically, these back turn set-ups are the result of positioning combined with Crumple Stuns or other related half-down states. With proper timing, positioning, and your opponent’s reliance on the common 4G or G methods of tech rolling you can reliably wake them into back turned position. Alternate positioning can also yield results against the rarer 2_8G or 6G methods of tech rolling.

Half-down states are an integral part of Ivy’s basic combo prowess, due to this, she easily has the highest concentration of back-turned wake-ups in Soul Calibur. Additionally, when you combine the bulk of her back-turned set-ups being applicable post GI and the moderate damage of her back throw, you can see just how important this over looked element is in her game.



Back Throw Set A: Versus LizardMan
Command:
GI, 1B+K, Forward Step, Left Step, G+A_G+B
What Happens:


Clearly, the confusing nature of 1B+K and its delayed impact can prove valuable post GI. Ivy then Steps forward and then left to align herself properly.
Notes:


The common forward Step, left Step is one of the easiest ways to initiate a back turned set-up. When your opponent has grown accustom to the set-up, combo through with another 1B+K to keep the damage levels high. Either way 1B+K is a solid post GI attack.



Back Throw Set B: Versus Mitsurugi
Command:
1A+B, Forward Step, Left Step, G+A_G+B
What Happens:


When 1A+B hits on counter hit a simple forward Step, left Step will initiate a back turned set-up.
Notes:


In some ways, this is both practical and impractical. As you may know, the 1A+B impacts late (i31) and does not really inflict any real damage. Therefore, few players would actually consider using it in actual combat. However, experienced Ivy players know that when a Summon Suffering is executed in error, 1A+B is the most common result. Opponents cowering in fear of the incoming Summon Suffering may be prone to eat an occasional 1A+B on counter hit. Knowing the best combo follow-through or wake-up potential should be second nature.



Back Throw Set C: Versus Astaroth
Command:
WS A+B, 8WR 3A, Right Step, Forward Step, Right Step, G+A_G+B
What Happens:


From WS A+B, Ivy executes the side stepping 8WR 3A. 8WR 3_9A can be used as a back turned set-up, but finesse in Stepping is required to align Ivy in time.
Notes:


Ivy’s WS A+B may seem like an improbable set-up initiator, however when you abuse the WS A+BA, 2A+B combo, you will find that opponents tend to cower after being struck with the single WS A+B. You can use this to set-up Summon Suffering attempts or less probable counter hits and attacks. Despite its slow impact, the 8WR 3_9A is actually a relatively useful attack. 8WR 3_9A garners bs-2 and induces crumple stun on hit. When 8WR 3_9A whiffs or is blocked, Step in the direction of the move itself and you should avoid most attacks while potentially setting Ivy into back throw range.



Back Throw Set D: Versus LizardMan
Command:
A, 1K, Left Step, A, G+A_G+B
What Happens:


When blocked, A yields bs0, so the high evading 1K will stuff any AA retaliatory attempt. From here, the common forward Step, left Step will also induce a back turned state on tech roll, yet I chose a slightly rarer and more complex form.
Notes:


Did you really think that old bastard WC was only going to wake people up backwards by abusing the tech roll to character proximity only? Here is a completely new class of back turned potential that will be highlighted in other Skill Projects: hit box location to confuse tech roll state. In this case, the hit box overlaps the character’s position in a way to make the downed character believe Ivy is technically in front of them. Thus, when a stand or roll is initiated, they will spring backwards into a back turned state.



Back Throw Set E: Versus Siegfried
Command:
9B, Forward Step, Left Step, G+A_G+B
What Happens:


Aside from 9A+BA or the RO potential of [G]9A_WL A, Ivy actually does not have any powerful jumping attacks. It is possible for 9B to be potent, however a moderate helping of anticipation is the only means to make it effective. As always, forward Step, left Step can make this happen, also experiment with left D-Step or left Slide Step.



Back Throw Set F: Versus Cervantes
Command:
GI, 3[K], Forward Step, Left Step, G+A_G+B
What Happens:


3[K] is another solid post GI attack that can initiate a back turned set-up. The common forward Step, left Step means will suffice.
Notes:


I like this one because it really does work post GI. The delay is strong enough to bait and when that fails the induced block stun is very rewarding.



Back Throw Set G: Versus Taki
Command:
66[K], 6A, Left Step, Forward Step, Left Step
What Happens:


Ivy’s 66[K] induces a moderate level of block stun and should be common set-up initiator. With the block stun of 6[K] behind it, 6A should be a near visceral DOS.
Notes:


6A could be an effective tool for Ivy, however she impotent without counter hits and thus falters with common DOS attacks. This back-turned set-up is not as applicable as some others are, yet it exists nonetheless.



Back Throw Set H: Versus LizardMan
Command:
3[K], 66A+B4, 44 BT, 2A, WS B, 4A, Left Slide Step×3
What Happens:


66A+B4 truly is one of those useless attacks, so justification of its usage here is not possible, but it does set-up the cute SC Moonwalk. BT 2As are generally very fast, thus walking backwards at your opponent may confuse them long enough to land one. WS B is just one of those attacks that hits easily, as it side steps and is generally safe. 4A is not one of her better stun inducers, but with some Slide Stepping it is possible to force your opponent into a back turned state.
Notes:


WS B is probably her best overall WS attack, it is safe, side steps, and lunges forward well. Due to its offline nature, it is a good set-up for a 3B counter hit among other essential attacks.

If you are wondering what Slide Step is, it is a means of Stepping in a single direction faster than the standard step by feathering G during the Step motion. The Koreans love to credit themselves with the discovery of this Step, however it has been around for a very long time and most likely discovered first by Japanese players. In a nutshell: (8G)N or (2G)N are the methods for Slide Step.

In addition, there is D-Step. D-Step is similar to Slide Step in that it effectively increases the distance the Step covers. D-Step, or Double Step, is the result of beginning 8WR from Step and then stopping, effectively the character will take an extra small step from the Step to cover a little more space. In a nutshell: 88 or 22 are the methods for D-Step.



Sequence 3: Versus Voldo
Command:
3[K], 66A, 2B, FC 3[A+B]
What Happens:


As previously stated, 3[K] garners a generous dose of block stun and 66A is typically the best overall follow-through. 66A to 2B is a guaranteed combo. Since Ivy recovers crouching it is wise to nail the tech roll attempt with FC 3[A+B].
Notes:


This not only chips out additional damage it also puts the opponent in long range facing a charging whip. As you may or may not know, the fully charged version will cover 180 degrees preventing 8WR altogether.



Sequence 4: Versus Kilik
Command:
4B, 6B, 9A+B, FC 1B, 8B+K, 44B+K1
What Happens:


Ivy opens with a standard linear poke string and then counters Kilik’s retaliation with 9A+B. 9A+B recovers crouching, thus FC 1B is applied against the crouching opponent to lift and combo. Due to the heavy damage induced by the lifting mid of 44B+K few opponents will consider blocking the second hit low regardless of how many times you use it.
Notes:


When I examine 9A + B or 9A + BA on paper, it is clearly a poor attack. However, when one analyzes how the single hitting 9A+B and multi-hitting 9A+BA end almost identically, it is easy to see how most opponents will give Ivy the time she needs. To keep this mix-up effective you will need to apply 9A+BA most of the time. When 9A+BA hits, you can combo through with 8B+K when the opponent fails to Air Control. If they do Air Control, nothing is truly guaranteed, however you can apply a variety of wake-up pressure though 3A+KA, WP A+K, WP B+K, 3B+K, 66A, or 8WR 2_8B. Once you have abused these, then begin using just the 9A+B followed by FC 1B. Eventually the opponent will simply block and punish you after the FC 1B, once they begin to cower, bust out the Summon Suffering and complete the circle.



Summon Suffering Set A: Versus Yoshimitsu
Command:
SS, Crouch, Right Step, SS
What Happens:


DOS stun is broken as the 214A+B whiffs. This is countered with a SS, followed by a long crouch, a Step, and another SS.
Notes:


I stated shortly after the Mitsu versus Nightmare versus videos were released that I found the optimal way to recover from DOS was to input the recovery as: [G]4646. Given this principle, If an Ivy inputs the DOS recovery as [G]37623[2], then she only needs to input 31A+B to release the SS as the throw whiffs. Clearly, movement method SS released after an SS is an effective wake-up, yet opponents are likely to wake-up crouching removing all potential. Personally, I have found that if I crouch next to a crouching opponent, for some reason they will eventually stand. I used that principle and the desire to demonstrate a long crouch followed by a Step into a SS.



Summon Suffering Set B: Versus S.Mina
Command:
Left Step, 3B, 6K, SS
What Happens:


3B lifts only high enough to land quick attacks like 6K, B, 2A or so forth. Due to the low proximity to the ground, if the opponent tries to AC they will often land on their feet. Pressuring the wake-up with a SS should be second nature.
Notes:


This sequence demonstrates my continual harp on the advantages of Stepping. Granted, you could GI the AAB, but why not evade it and attain guaranteed damage?



Summon Suffering Set C: Versus Taki
Command:
2A+K, [G]9B, Right Step SS
What Happens:


2A+K has the potential to evade all high attacks as well as several mids. [G]9B is guaranteed after 2A+K and this is followed with a right Step SS to catch the wake-up attack.
Notes:


There are a variety of ways to pressure the wake-up in this situation. Among them, I recommend the Step SS, WP A+K, or 66A.



Summon Suffering Set D: Versus Rock
Command:
66K, Slide, Right Step, Right Step SS
What Happens:


After a 66K, Slide is used to down the opponent, Ivy follows with two Steps and a SS.
Notes:


While impractical, this sequence makes the grade to show that movement method SS can be used to Step multiple times. The current record is four Steps and then an SS.



Summon Suffering Set E: Versus Maxi
Command:
2A, 66[K], SS
What Happens:


Given the block advantage of 66[K], it is wise to follow a standard interrupt with one. In this scenario, Maxi counters with 2A and proceeds with FC 3A->RO. Ivy blocks the low and executes a SS before he can advance into RO.
Notes:


By using the movement method SS pre-buffer, you can effectively buffer SS, then block low, and release during your opponent’s recovery. The SS is more effective in this means that most throws simply because of how far and wide it reaches.



Summon Suffering Set F: Versus Nightmare
Command:
GI, SS, Left Step, SS
What Happens:


Post GI the initial SS is broken, from there a left Step SS is executed.
Notes:


I firmly believe SS should only be used in a handful of ways, defensively from movement method or post block, from minor pokes from A, 2A, B or similar attacks, or post GI. In the past, I have seen many people say to SS after a SS throw break, however the spacing logic involved simple points away from this. Therefore, why not Step SS instead? In the least, Ivy is one Step closer and off line. This sequence was designed with this in mind.



Summon Suffering Set G: Versus Lizardman
Command:
66[K], 2A, RCC 2A+B, 8B+K, Left Step SS
What Happens:


From the block stun induced by 66[K] it is impossible to stop 2A. Given common post 2A spacing, post hit, 2A RCCed to 2A+B is also impossible to interrupt. This sets the stage for the 8B+K combo follow through and left Step SS.
Notes:


Keep in mind that after an 8B+K based combo the opponent will be prone in a back turned position. Thus, attacks will be BT attacks. In this case, most attacks are fast, yet linear. Step SS is a perfect tool here.



Summon Suffering Set H: Versus Sophitia
Command:
GI, 4B+KG, WS K, 44[a+b], Right Step SS
What Happens:


Post GI 4B+KG can be an effective means to lure an rGI and execute a WS attack. This pushes Sophie into mid range where she is forced out with 44[a+b]. Despite its ability to shut down Steps, Sophie’s 66A is countered with a right Step SS.
Notes:


I cannot sing the praises of 44[a+b] enough. The minor charge often provokes opponents to flee in fear, only to be cut down as you release early. It covers a wide arch and serves well to promote foolish retaliation. Know your opponent’s character and the best way to counter Step, it is to the right.



Summon Suffering Set I: Versus Astaroth
Command:
GI, 44B+K1, Right Step, SS
What Happens:


Post GI, 44B+K1 is fairly strong. As stated before, in fear of the release, few opponents will block low, use this factor to chew off life and push them into mid range. Asta tries to ride the Bull Rush Express back to Ivy, only be clutched into her loving arms.
Notes:


This is semi-practical, however the goal here was to end the SS series with the blue glow.



Sequence 5: Versus Astaroth (Credit Roll)
Command:
Spirit Charge, 8WRB 3A, 6A, 8WRB 3A×3, 66A, 2B
Notes:


If you know your math, you know this combo does 247~253 damage. That is death. There is a lot to say here; you could do this combo as Spirit Charge, 8WRB 3A, 6A, 8WRB 3A×2, B6K for death as well. Obviously this is an Asta or Rock combo only, works at the edge only, and you could just do a mere 3B after the first 8WR 3A for the easy RO. Therefore, this sequence is completely impractical. If you are looking for the infinite here, most consistent way to achieve it is as (8WRB 3A, 8WRB9A)N. The alternating 8WR 3A_9A will keep Ivy aligned properly, however perfect 8WR Buffering is required.






Additional Information


Summon Suffering (SS) Movement Study:

Visit the SS Movement Technique Study.



Whip Buffering:

Visit the Whip Buffering Study. (Forum Thread Link)



Musical Score:

Artist : Orbital
Song Title : Way Out
Albums : Middle of Nowhere, The All Together, Insides, etc.

For some SPs, the music is selected far before the desire or inspiration to do the SP is ever felt. For me, Way Out conveys Ivy like no other piece of music can. Unfortunately, Way Out is a long piece, and I firmly believe it conveys it as a whole. Eight minute SPs are not possible so regretfully, I could only provide a sliver of the whole picture I had hoped to paint. No other piece was ever a candidate.

If you like this song you may like other tracks from Orbital, leeching .mp3 files is certainly convenient, however people should do their utmost to support music they enjoy so the artist can continue to produce music. That and .mp3 files compress the high-end treble and bass essentially cutting out chunks of the music, though few people own audio equipment fine enough to discern the subtle differences.

Check out Orbital’s other albums or sample tunes from Middle of Nowhere at www.cdnow.com.



Creation and Production:


I would first like to extend a huge thanks to Vintoks. His willingness to cross those mountains several times brought the Ivy Skill Project to completion in a timely manner.

Assistance:
elk
Vintoks

Special Thanks:
Fhwang Sung Kyung

The software used to generate this video were Adobe Premier, Adobe After Effects, LigosLSX, FlasK MPEG, and Adobe PhotoShop. Honestly, I was hoping to do a more stylish piece to match my appreciation for the music involved, however I chose to edit the Ivy Skill Project tightly to preserve its ability to be downloaded. Video was captured in Windows 98 Second Edition on a Pinnacle Systems DC 30 Plus using the cards proprietary software, the source samples were then trimmed down in Adobe Premier then eventually synchronized and composed using Adobe Premier and Adobe After Effects. Audio was attained from the source CD via Music Match Jukebox. All in all, to complete this project a total of thirty-two files consisting of over 2.3 gigabytes were used. The final .avi file was then encoded to .mpg file.
 

Tactu

[09] Warrior
My personal favorite. Music and video match the char perfectly. Too bad she's so boring without SCC and her moves in SC4. Good thing Maxi is still so fun. :)

Video -

Sequence 1: Versus LizardMan
Command:
2365A+K, 44A, iGT, 8WR 3B+K, 66B
What Happens:
When blocked A+K yields bs+2, which for a fast character like Sophie, is an exceptional advantage. Additionally, Sophie recovers faster from the counter-hit 44A animation sooner than the actual end of the animation cycle, so it is possible to buffer in solid wake-ups. In this case, the iGT (see iGT study link) is used as a trap, to stay down or stand in place results in eating the UB, while rolling results in being stunned. From the Quake Stun, 8WR 3B+K, 66B is one of the more simple and high damage combo options.

Notes:
If you know Sophie, you know that in this case the iGT came out even faster than a standard 8A+B. When you consider iGT bears all the power and effect of a fully charged 8[A+B] in less time than an 8A+B, you can see how it can lead to limitless traps and set-ups. This is truly one of the more significant SC finds.





Sequence 2: Versus Rock
Command:
23656G+A, 1K, 22B+K
What Happens:
Near the edge, Rock’s string of 4A, 3KA is a common 66K trap. If you block the 4A, you have to block the 3KA. If you block the 3KA, you then need to block the 66K. Sophie evades this trap by crouch dashing under the 3KA and punishing Rock with the 66G+A throw. Asta and Rock have slow back-turned attacks, so they are forced to eat the 1K after a 66G+A throw. This is unique to these characters, so players ignorant to this will be prone to counter hits.

Notes:
While this sequence is a bit orchestrated, the focus point is the 1K trap after 66G+A.





Sequence 3: Versus Kilik
Command:
2365632B, 23659KA, GI, bG, BK, 4B, GI, A+KK
What Happens:
The 8WR 2B evades high attacks, so it is another great compliment to the crouch dash cancel. The 9KA is actually safer than it may initially seem, Sophie at bs-11, however the fastest WS attacks are i12. Few opponents will have access to such data, so shut them down with a 1_3GI. As stated before, her BK is an awesome mix-up initiator, here it is applied to force the opponent to block 4B. The 4B induces Forced Crouch State with Sophie at bs-2. This is a perfect opportunity for her to Step around their attacks or simply shut them down with a 1_3GI. Post GI, A+KK easily baits the rGI and checkmates for the RO.

Notes:
This sequence is a lesson in data; because her data is known it is possible to know the ideal GI set-ups and how to best follow-through on them.





Sequence 4: Versus Ivy
Command:
GI, iGT, 3A+B, Step, 8WR 3B, 4[A], 236B
What Happens:
Obviously, iGT post GI is a powerful trap. If they rGI, they eat the UB. If they dash, they are stunned. Therefore, the only viable solution is to attack, which with perfect iGT timing, is almost impossible. The angle of Quake Stun initiates one of Sophie’s rarer back-turned set-ups; only the first hit of 3A+B can connect for this to work. With this initiated step to the left side and the opponent will rise in back-turned regardless of who they tech roll. The rise is slow, so it is best to execute a slower attack, like 8WR 3B, to capitalize on the advantage.

Notes:
Post GI, iGT is not completely guaranteed, though difficult, the opponent can side step and hold guard to avoid the trap. Prayer may be helpful as well. 8WR 3B, 4[A], 236B is not one hundred percent guaranteed, however it is very hard to AC out of. If your opponent does consistently AC out of it, switch to 8WR 3B, 4[A], 3A or 66A.





Sequence 5: Versus Yoshimitsu
Command:
2365B+K, G+B2B, 66B, 3A+B, dash in, 1K
What Happens:
Since Sophie is technically crouching during a crouch dash, vertical mids will be the most common retaliation attempt. With this in mind, one should consider her B+K as a means to evade and punish. B+K avoids both low attacks and vertical attacks, so it should evade both B based attacks and 2As. On hit, B+K garners hs+6, this is enough of an advantage to force your opponent to evade the throw. Retaliation should be expected and the most common form is AA, so use her G+B throw in this case. Sophie is already in range, so there is no need to dash in. Despite appearances, Sophie is actually at an advantage when the opponent breaks the second part of the G+B chain throw. You can pre-buffer attacks long before she visually recovers and beat out your opponent. In this case, 66B is the tool of choice. Using 3A+B after 66B garners both high damage and allows Sophie to recover quickly to pursue wake-up attacks.

Notes:
Take some time to test the G+B2B break on your own, it is an interesting scenario.





Sequence 6: Versus Mitsurugi
Command:
23652B, FC 3B, 8WR Left A, 8WRB 3K, 236B
What Happens:
Since the 2B slides low, it is an effective crouch dash alternative. Also, 2B bears a powerful mind-game, opponents typically expect the second hit and hesitate allowing you enough time to force them to block an FC 3B. These attacks are identical and it is easy to continue to pattern until you sense a counter hit and then punish your prey. However, on hit FC 3B garners hs+9! The 8WR Left A is i19, so with perfect timing, even the fastest A will be countered, trading hits in Sophie’s favor. Counter hit 8WR Left A, 8WRB 3K, 236B is a true combo.

Notes:
I love this sequence and look forward to developing more traps like it. With perfect execution, the 2B or FC 3B hit to 8WRB Left A is an awesome trap.





Sequence 7: Versus Nightmare
Command:
44B, 6A, A+B+K~G, 2365B+K, 6A, 2365[A+B], 1AA
What Happens:
Night initiates a common 3->NBS, NBS KK pattern. Sophie’s 44B evades high attacks, so it is the perfect tool to counter the second kick. Furthermore, the 44B is also a SCrUB, perhaps one of the most easily abused SCrUBs in the game. After the crouch dash to WS B+K SCrUB connects the same pattern is initiated with crouch dash to WS [A+B]. The WS [A+B] can DOS on back dash counter, and it turns the opponent around on hit. The back dash counter is rare, so you should expect them to be back-turned most of the time. From here, any attack that evades high attacks is applicable.

Notes:
This sequence is truly in the realm of fantasy, however it does illustrate a variety of set-ups from her basic lifters. Since the WS B+K (44B) also hits grounded opponents, it is clear how venerable a tool this can be when charged.





Sequence 8: Versus Cervantes
Command:
4[A], 23656321A, 1A, iGT, 66G+A, 236AA, 66B, 236B, AA
What Happens:
4[A] garners bs+1 and has two fast follow-up attacks that force your opponent into a defensive posture. This opportunity is seized with a crouch dash 8WR 1A. On hit, the 8WR 1A yields hs+8, which for a fast character like Sophie, can lead to a variety of mix-ups. In this case, 1A is used to evade the common retaliatory AA and down the opponent. Then, iGT is applied as they attempt to gain ground. Quake Stun shows the opponent’s right side, which leads to her high-damage side throw. So, it is wise to pursue a Quake Stun with 66G+A; either way you have the potential to use a high-damage and difficult to escape throw. Sophie has one of the better post-throw break games, in addition to cutting down 8WR, her 236AA will shut down just about everything her opponent may stick out. 66B can ground hit after 66B, yet it can also be blocked. However, 66B initiates a perfect 236B set-up.

Notes:
The focal point here is really her potential post-throw break, not so much iGT. Additionally, this shows the strength of her 236. For those controlling Sophie, it is easy to pre-buffer 236B4 and mash on the AA. If you connect deep, the strike will shift to throw, if not you can combo through with the AA, either way you have opportunities to do additional damage.





Sequence 9: Versus Taki
Command:
4[A]B, 2365BK, A+B, 2K, 66G+A
What Happens:
The guard stun induced by 4[A] often provokes people to eat the proceeding B, it is just the habitual nature of players to want to retaliate. This downs the opponent in a way that is easy to pressure and Sophie follows with her venerable BK. On hit or block, the BK initiates a variety of set-ups, however strong As will defeat most of them. It is easy to assume an opponent like Taki or Mitsu will casually AA their way out of trouble, anticipate this with her A+B reversal to score free damage. As you know, a variety of low hits are guaranteed after the closer reversal, oddly, on Taki only, the 2K will provoke her into a back-turned state. I hesitated on the throw to capture the side throw as she began to turn around, this does far more damage, yet requires infinitely better timing.

Notes:
If you know your math, with the reversal plus the 2K; in addition to the side throw, 124 points of damage have been dealt. That is over fifty percent! I would love to detour to my usual anti-Lizardman propaganda spree and use this as a separation for her greatness, however this only works on Taki. However, in the same breath, the reversal is a clearly a separation. Moreover, when one considers the methodical means that most players abuse common A's, I wonder why more dialogs on the strengths of this reversal have yet to form. As a side note: either reversal is a perfect set-up for iGT.





Sequence 10: Versus Astaroth
Command:
66B+KAB, 8WR Right A, Right Step G+B
What Happens:
Sophie rushes Asta with the common 66B+KAB rush-down. While it is GI-bait, the rush is still an effective means to cover terrain and pressure an opponent. In this case, Asta does the logical post GI and chooses superior terrain advantage combined with the 4 trap potential. As solid a trap it may be, there are aggressive ways around it, the evasive 8WR Right A is one of those. This leads to another practical back-turned set-up for Sophie and garners the RO.

Notes:
This sequence is actually practical, it demonstrates the 8WR Right A’s ability to evade high attacks and its strength in back-turned set-ups. Unfortunately, back-turned set-ups do not serve Sophie well, her back throw does minimal damage and none of her high-damage lifters are fast enough. In most cases, it is best to follow a back-turn set-up with a BB, unless you know it may lead to an RO from the back throw.










Additional Information


iGT Technique Analysis:

Visit the iGT Skill Project Technique Study




Musical Score:

Artist: Jam&Spoon with vocals by Plavka
Song Title: Angel (Ladadi O-Heyo) Airplay Edit
Albums: Tripomatic Fairytales 2001 / 2002, Kaleidoscope, others. Also reference Tokyo Ghetto Pussy and Storm
Jam&Spoon have been working the trance-pop scene for a long time, their club hits Right in the Night, Stella, and Kaleidoscope proves their legacy. I have been a fan of their music for quite sometime, but unfortunately, their work is extremely hard to find. Here is a link to thier music at both Amazon.com and CDNOW.com.

Their Tokyo Ghetto Pussy (we all want some) and Storm groups are much harder to find. These groups are dedicated to strictly club tracks. Personally, of their albums, I highly recommend Kaleidoscope. Kaleidoscope covers an array of styles that should satisfy anyone that enjoys electronic music.

With the fall of Napster, it is even easier for me to get on the soapbox and preach the wonders of CD purchasing. The bulk of my tracks come from smaller groups that could certainly use the exposure.





Creation and Production:


I would like to take a moment to first extend a warm thanks to elk. Without his constant research keeping Sophie in my face, this video would not exist.

Assistance:
elk

Special Thanks:
johNNy bLaZe

The software used to generate this video were Adobe Premier, Adobe After Effects, LigosLSX, FlasK MPEG, and Adobe PhotoShop. I continue to learn the massively complex After Effects and I am enjoying the results. I look forward to future videos reflecting the character’s style even more. Video was captured in Windows NT on a Pinnacle Systems DC 30 Plus using the cards proprietary software, the source samples were then trimmed down in Adobe Premier then eventually synchronized and composed using Adobe Premier and Adobe After Effects. Audio was attained from the source CD via Music Match Jukebox. All in all, to complete this project a total of thirty-five files consisting of over 2.4 gigabytes were used. The final .avi file was then encoded to .mpg file
 

Soupy

[09] Warrior
The software used to generate this video were Adobe Premier, Adobe After Effects, LigosLSX, FlasK MPEG, and Adobe PhotoShop. I continue to learn the massively complex After Effects and I am enjoying the results. I look forward to future videos reflecting the character’s style even more. Video was captured in Windows NT on a Pinnacle Systems DC 30 Plus using the cards proprietary software, the source samples were then trimmed down in Adobe Premier then eventually synchronized and composed using Adobe Premier and Adobe After Effects. Audio was attained from the source CD via Music Match Jukebox. All in all, to complete this project a total of thirty-five files consisting of over 2.4 gigabytes were used. The final .avi file was then encoded to .mpg file
Not trying to sound mean, or being offensive.
Was there a point in using AE(After Effects) or Flask when this whole thing could have just been done in premiere?
_________________________________________
====== DOUBLE POST AUTO-MERGE ======
Unlike previous efforts, this piece was composed largely in Adobe After Effects and Adobe Illustrator. I used Adobe Premiere to edit down the source material and to create the black and white pauses (using exported stills into Photoshop). Adobe Illustrator helped coordinate the bulk of the math involved and create the sixty-one masks applied. Masking and layering made the motion possible, Adobe After Effects, blood, sweat, tears handled all this, and a whole lot of crying as my PC crashed all too often. I think the scale of this labor can been seen in the raw number of files involved; one hundred thirty-eight, and the number of Adobe After Effects layers involved; sixty-five. There are many points I am not personally satisfied with, but getting this done in a timely manner meant a lot.

Video was captured in Windows 98 Second Edition on a Pinnacle Systems DC 30 Plus using the cards proprietary software, the source samples were then trimmed down in Adobe Premier then eventually synchronized and composed using Adobe Premier and Adobe After Effects. Audio was attained from the source CD via Music Match Jukebox. All in all, to complete this project a total of one hundred thirty-either files consisting of over 2.7 gigabytes were used. The final .avi file was then encoded to .mpg file using Ligos Suite 2.0 and to DIVX format using FlasK MPEG and the DIVX 4.0 codec.

Also, the masks you were describing, to make it simple you can add layer masks in premiere, makes it easier than importing from AE, and can all be done in timeline rather than different layers
 

Tactu

[09] Warrior
Not trying to sound mean, or being offensive.
Was there a point in using AE(After Effects) or Flask when this whole thing could have just been done in premiere?
_________________________________________
====== DOUBLE POST AUTO-MERGE ======



Also, the masks you were describing, to make it simple you can add layer masks in premiere, makes it easier than importing from AE, and can all be done in timeline rather than different layers
I didn't write these posts. They are being archived here from the Soul Calibur I site Guardimpact.com for people who are interested in SC 1 and some of the cool things that happened back then. They were originally done several years ago by WCMaxi who is now a Namco producer.
 

Marginal

Chikara Sashimi
Also, the masks you were describing, to make it simple you can add layer masks in premiere, makes it easier than importing from AE, and can all be done in timeline rather than different layers
Could it be that Premier wasn't as good when you were 6?
 

Koz

[10] Knight
I know this is a few years old thread, but there seems to be three set of notes still missing. Remember, these were all written by WCMaxi, back in 2001.

TAKI:


Sequence 1:
Notes:
If you failed to catch the importance of this sequence your first time, watch it again before reading further. Now, if after watching it a second time you are still clueless stop playing SC and go shoot yourself.

Humor aside, Taki just canceled a state of being GIed into her 66G+B throw. Reference the 66G+B Study for more information. Cervy is back thrown in this case because he uses the common 1a, this attack presents insanely deceptive rGI timing with an UB at the end. Yet, one GI canceled 66G+B changes everything.

Sequence 2:
Command:
3KK9B+K, BT B+K, 3A, RCC 2AK, RCC 3KK9B+K

What Happens:
This sequence is in place solely to demonstrate the WR’s ability to set Taki into BT. If you use the side WR near the edge it often has this effect, this can be effective to surprise the opponent and set-up her venerable BT B+K . The BT B+K leaves her opponent in Forced Crouch State with a +2 advantage, when you consider that most WS or FC attacks impact in 14 frames you can see how she holds the advantage with a 3A follow through.

Notes:
Pat yourself on the back if you actually knew you could WR into BT. If you did not know, then just pretend you did and remind me how contrived this all is and how much better you are. I know the RCC sequence here is rather unbelievable, but RCC is not one of Taki’s stronger suits, in most cases she should RCC into her 3KK3_9B+K series.

Sequence 3:
Command:
AB1B->PO, PORC iPO 4A, AB1B->PO, PORC 66ABBB, 9A+B

What Happens:
This sequence is in place to demonstrate the rarer PORC possibilities. First, I wanted to show the iPO 4A from PORC, while it is not as lucid as a true POR 4A it is still very close to the rush tool every Taki user has dreamt of. Second, few Taki users even consider using 66 based attacks from PORC, either the wrist speed or rhythm required eludes them. It may seem difficult during the first few attempts, but once you have mastered the rhythm and speed required, pulling it out consistently becomes natural.

Notes:
I do not use the 66 PORC method for the PORC 66G+B technique, please reference that section for more information.

Sequence 4:
Command:
3B, KK3kB, BBB1->PO, PO 4A, iPO 4A, iPO B

What Happens:
KK after a 3B lift is fairly difficult to AC out of, combine this with the wake-up advantage found in the canceled WR and you have potentially Taki’s best overall combo follow through after a non CH 3B. In this case, the WR trades sides, which could possibly confuse the opponent’s guard as they rise. The BB1B->PO series is in place to demonstrate the iPO 4A followed by iPO B.

Notes:
Few Taki players know about the WR cancel from KKK. The command to cancel the final kick requires a 1FS to B and can only be use in conjunction with 1, 2, or 3 directional inputs. Therefore, KK1_2_3kB is the only method available. Considering the impact time of the K; at 11 frames, and the safety a WR shift brings, this cancel should be an integral part of any Taki game.

Overall, this series is nothing special, it is simply in place to demonstrate the KKK~WR cancel and iPO. I kept this sequence simple so viewers would easily pick up the new techniques being demonstrated.

The iPO technique has nothing to do with pretentious yuppie start-ups, please reference the iPO section below for more information.

Sequence 5:
Command:
3A, RCC AB1B->PO, PORC 66G+B

What Happens:
Granted, after leaping over such a predicable low one would be far better off going for a WL A, but to demonstrate my point I choose 3A after the jump. After the 3A connects I RCC to AB1B->PO and then PORC to 66G+B.

Notes:
This sequence is in place solely to demonstrate using RCC to transition to AB1B->PO. All to often, Taki players rely n her WS and FC attacks after a 3A interrupt, this tendency will allow your opponent to reliably rGI you each time. Her throw range and speed are sub-par so using RCC to a fast HM series is almost ideal in this case. This series also demonstrates the PORC 66G+B, please reference the study on it for more information.

Back Throw Series:

As stated in the Kilik project, wake-ups are far more important in SC than combos. Each project will highlight potential means to wake in the opponent into a back turned state. I would have further highlighted this theory with Kilik, but he lacks the set-ups and stuns required to demonstrate this fundamental.

Typically these back turn set-ups are the result of positioning combined with Crumple Stuns or other related half-down states. With proper timing, positioning, and your opponent’s reliance on the common 4G or G methods of tech rolling you can reliably wake them into back turned position. Alternate positioning can also yield results against the rarer 2_8G or 6G methods of tech rolling.

Back Throw Set A:
Command:
B>A1-> PO, PORC 3B, AB1B->PO, PORC 9B+K, bG[2]->iFC, WS K CH, 9B+K, 66G+B

What Happens:
3B from PORC can be effective to evade vertical attacks. When 3B fails to connect on CH it does not offer a variety of reliable combo follow through options, but using this opportunity to combo through with AB1B->PO to PORC based wake-ups is a wise option. From here the G Cancel iFC is demonstrated, please reference that section for more details. Naturally, this cancel will easily provoke a CH after a WR. Once the CH WS K connects roll behind with 3_9B+K and you will wake the opponent into a BT state.

Notes:
This sequence is a host of subtle techniques that every Taki user should pay careful attention to. AB1B->PO follow through from a 3B can be unreliable. However, the ability to rush in for PORC based wake-ups should never be ignored. Once you have trained you opponent to wait out WRs by consistently doing side WR A they will be more prone to eat side WR based fakes. Taki’s WS K is among her most important attacks, thus any effective means to set it up needs thorough examination, and in this case, the G Cancel iFC technique provides the perfect opportunity.

At 77 points of damage, WS K CH, FC 1A+B, A+K is one of Taki’s staple combos. If there is any error in timing, it is possible to block the final hits by holding 4G. Anyone accustom to this will be prone to automatically holding this, with this in mind, the WS K CH, 3_9B+K BT set-up demands attention.

Back Throw Set B:
Command:
AB1B->PO, PORC AB1B->PO, PORC 8WR 8K, forward Step, left Step, 66G+B

What Happens:
A series of AB1B->PO is followed closely by PORC 8WR 8K. Once this connects you can wake the opponent into BT with either a 9B+K or a forward Step, left Step.

Notes:
Granted, this one seems a tad contrived, however as previously stated AB1B->PO, PORC guarantees your opponent will be unable to interrupt if you follow with an A based series. This advantage is seldom known, thus most opponents will still try to interrupt, with this in mind following an AB1B->PO with another is extremely effective. In this case the second AB1B->PO from PORC is hardly smooth, so it does leave some room for interrupts. The PORC 8WR 8K is about as smooth as it can possibly done, hopefully Taki users take this lead to further investigate PORC. Reference the PORC article for more information on smoothly executing 8WR attacks from PORC.

Beck Throw Set C:
Command:
66A1->PO, PORC left Step, 214->PO, PO B, left Step, 66G+B

What Happens:
Given the dominate advantage time a 66A1->PO yields it is wise to cancel into Step from time to time. This sudden shift in your sequence can be effective to lure a whiffed attack and set-up a combo or throw.

Notes:
The standard BB is actually a highly effective means to shut down PORC; it’s fast enough to thwart PO B, and PO K, arches high enough to hit PO 7_8_9K, and has a long enough hit duration to catch PO A. This however, is only applicable when the Taki going into PORC has no advantage time, but non-users will fail to discern these miniscule differences and continually attempt it. As shown, BB is highly vulnerable to Step tactics.

Back Throw Set D:
Command:
AB1B->PO, PORC AA[2]->iFC, FC A+KK CH, A+B, 66G+B

What Happens:
It’s important to remember that on hit AB1B->PO yields a 14 frame advantage into PO, PORC can occur 10 frames after the initial PO, therefore PORC AA from a hit AB1B cannot be interrupted. Only the elite Taki players know she can instantly cancel into FC on the left side from AA. This rare cancel is demonstrated to show FC A+KK. Considering that few Taki users know this technique it means even fewer non-users will understand it. Thus, they will assume she’s done AA, 1K in this case, this can be used to provoke the CH. Flip over after the second hit connects on CH to score a free BT state.

Notes:
I do question the practicality of this sequence. However, there is probably no other way to reliably set-up the FC A+KK for a second hit CH . Understanding the AA[2]->iFC left side cancel is important for the ninja, with it she can instantly go from AA to her WS attacks or FC attacks.

Back Throw Set E:
Command:
B[K](opponent GIs), Asta 44[A], rGI, Bg[2]->iFC 1A+B, forward Step, left Step, 66G+B

What Happens:
Abuse leads to solutions, Taki is reliant on the block stun induced by the B[K] or BA[K] series, but eventually this reliance will lead to the opponent finding solutions. GI is life and death for Asta, but in this case the B[K] will push him just out of throw range, so instead Asta follows with the difficult to rGI and high damage 44[A]. Taki rGIs and places herself into ideal FC 1A+B range.

Notes:
The centerpiece here is the G Cancel iFC technique, everything else is mere dress rehearsal for this. When you consider the post GI advantages of the G Cancel iFC 1A+B, it really brings the strength of this technique to light. You can follow the FC 1A+B with a reliable 1A combo or attempt the BT set-up.

Back Throw Set F:
Command:
3A, WS K (opponent GI), Yoshi 214A+B, rGI, 4B+K>A, AA8->8WR, 8WR 8A CH, 9B+K, 66G+B

What Happens:
This sequences opens with a common interrupt and retaliate pattern seen in any high-end SC match. From here, a brief rGI contest begins with Taki demonstrating the 4B+K’s prowess in post GI scenarios. Naturally, one may question why I choose the AA->8WR cancel over 8WRB, AA->8WR actually cancels the AA 10 frames before its free frame. So in this case, A based attacks would miss due to the crouching frames of the 8WR 8A, 2A could prove unreliable due to the minor side step, and B attacks would trade hits. Obviously, the opponent used a B attack. From here, use a 3_9B+K to wake the opponent into a BT state.

Notes:
This sequence is actually my personal favorite in this project, despite the choreography everything is conceivable. Taki evades the high in Yoshi’s 8WR 1BA with 3A and follows with the ever common WS K. The GI sequence is fully believable and similar wars have been wage among us all. And without question, the hit trade at the end is the icing on the cake.

Sequence 6:
Command:
BB1B->PO, PO 4A, BB1B->PO, PORC A+B+K~2G->iFC, WS K CH, FC 1A+B, 214->PO, POR A+B

What Happens:
First, this sequence demonstrates PO and PORC’s subtle power to train the opponent into a constrained set of reactions. Once the opponent is train to turtle they are then baited with a Soul Charge canceled into an iFC WS K.

Notes:
While this sequence is a tad contrived, it should give rise to some interesting concepts. The PORC Soul Charge on a defensive opponent can lead to her lightning quick A6 SCrUB. If your timing is off in the slightest during the common WS K CH, FC 1A+B, A+K combo your opponent can rise quick enough to block the final A+K. Anticipating this can score sudden PORC or PO based attacks as they scramble to their feet.

Sequence 7:
Command:
BA1->PO, PORC 3KK9B+K, 8WRB 8B, 4B->PO, PORC WL A, RCC B[K], 66A1->PO, PORC 4B+K

What Happens:
By using the delay in BA1->PO you can often score the advantage time PORC so dearly needs. From here, PORC 3K based series are always wise to advance yourself while setting up WR based series. This final segment can be avoided with AC, yet it should demonstrate how effective trading guaranteed damage for ideal wake-ups can be.

Notes:
Taki’s 3K series is extremely fast and advances her well, once you have mastered the timing, it should develop into one of your most common PORC attacks. When your opponent has eaten a slew of WR As they will tend to take a defensive posture when they see one. Granted, you can take this opportunity to set-up throws, but you should first blend in a variety of mid attacks. Since 8WR 2_8B hits twice on its own it allows more AC than more of her lifting attacks, thus it is wise to go for a quick strike, like 4B->PO, that can initiate strong wake-ups.

Sequence 8:
Command:
B[K], 8WRB 8A CH, 8WRB 8K x 5, 3B

What Happens:
The B[K] yields a 7 frame advantage when blocked and causes a Forced Axis Stagger. 8WR 2A evades H attacks and impacts in 18 frames. Thus A attacks will be evaded, 2A attacks will lack reliability, and B attacks will not impact in time to stop an 8WRB 8A. This is followed by five 8WRB 8Ks and a single 3B to RO the opponent.

Notes:
This infinite also existed in the beta version of the arcade, however back then, she could execute from any location in the ring. I am proud to say we caught that infinite before the final version, yet with the ease of 8WRB in the DC version and the stipulations centered around ring positioning near the edge, it seems to have resurfaced. Realistically, the stipulations to land the infinite are so strict that you will never see it in match play, and if you do, they could just do a 3B after the first 8WR 8K to RO, so it’s checkmate regardless.

I had hoped to use A6 after the 8WR 8K, but each time I connected with a 3B after five 8WRB 8Ks it instantly ROed. The Inferno video will highlight rare combos and Inferno only combos, hopefully I will have time to include this combo then.

Sequence 9:
Command:
B+KB, 44K, (BT B+K, 44K)x6

What Happens:
B+KB is used to lift followed by 44K to position Taki in BT. From her she can pressure with her venerable BT B+K.

Notes:
This is a useless sequence I choose to fill space for the credit roll. There is one tiny grain to pull from this, 44K can be used in a combo in place of the 66B. Using 44K will often leave Taki in BT allowing her to mix-up her rare BT attacks or it will keep Taki in her ideal wake-up range. Either way all Taki users should consider 44K and favor ideal wake-ups over the simple damage of 66B.

Additional Information

Possession Rush Cancel (PORC) Study:

Visit the PORC Technique Study.

Instant Possession (iPO) and 66G+B Study:

Visit the iPO and 66G+B Technique Study.

G-Cancel Instant Full Crouch (iFC) Study:

Visit the G-Cancel Instant Full Crouch Technique Study.

Musical Score:

Artist : Sasha
Song Title : Xpander Edit
Albums : Xpander EP, Ref: Global Underground, Wipeout 1-3, others...

Xpander is actually old by club standards, yet even back then no piece of music gave me more of a warm fuzzy Taki feeling than this piece. I had also considered Sandstorm by Darude, Diablo by Cass and Slide, and Airwave by Rank1. But in the end, no piece could match the shear rush feeling Xpander embodied.

I am actually a big fan of Sasha, I have witness his brilliance live once and have been moved since. He is easily one of the top DJs in the world. Unfortunately finding his original scores can be quite challenging, their rare nature or vinyl only nature gives rise to such. I would like to get on my soap box and say, “Leeching .mp3 files is certainly convenient, however people should do their utmost to support music they enjoy so the artist can continue to produce music.” Yet, even I know that is easier said than done in this case. You should have no trouble finding the Xpander EP or his DJ sessions with Global Underground (I personally highly recommend the Ibiza CD set). Also keep in mind that and .mp3 files compress the high-end treble and bass essentially cutting out chunks of the music, though few people own audio equipment fine enough to discern the subtle differences. It was said in the last project and it will be said each time, reference the following link if you would like to find more tracks from Sasha.

For those interested, you can find Sasha CDs for sale at: http://www.cdnow.com/

Creation and Production:

The video as way too long so I had to make the credit roll run a lot faster than I had planned. Let me take a moment to give thanks to everyone in the credits.

Assistance :
Srayer
elk
KilikFreak
Kimcheeman

Design :
Indigo

Contributors :
Fhwang Sung Kyung
Mishmashi

Concepts, Support :
Misato-san
FetZ

The software used to generate this video were Adobe Premier, Adobe After Effects, and Adobe PhotoShop. A lot has been learned about After Effects since the last project and I think it shows, hopefully my learning curve will continue to push forward with each new project. Video was captured in Windows NT on a Pinnacle Systems DC 30 Plus using the cards proprietary software, the source samples were then trimmed down in Adobe Premier then eventually synchronized and composed using Adobe Premier and Adobe After Effects. Audio was attained from the source CD via Music Match Jukebox. All in all, to complete this project a total of forty-seven files consisting of over 3.3 gigabytes were used. The final .avi file was then encoded to .mpg file format using LSX-MPEG Encoder.
 

Koz

[10] Knight
VOLDO:


Sequence 1: Versus Ivy (1P)
Command:
6B+K, G+K

What Happens:
Ivy pokes Voldo with 2A followed by a SS. Voldo evades the SS with a 6B+K and grabs her with G+K.

Notes:
There are a number of throw set-up scenarios you could apply the 6B+K in, yet the base question will always be; why not just crouch? First, crouch and do FC G+A, now do FC G+B, then do FC G+K, now sing Britney’s “Oops I did it again” for me. Voldo’s G+K is easily his most important throw, the escape window is 11 frames, opposed to 13 frames, and the damage is well above his other throws.

Sequence 2: Versus Hwang (1P)
Command:
2B+K, G+A

What Happens:
Hwang opens with a dominate rush series and attempts to combo from 8WR 3A CH to 8WRB 3B. Voldo DOS breaks and evades with 2B+K follow by a back throw.

Notes:
Some may wonder why Voldo fails to make he grade and become top tier material. Clearly, he has range, deception, damage, and the set-up tricks that compose the current upper crust, but there is something critical missing. This something is foundation. Voldo’s basics are all slow, his A is i12, his B is i19, and his K is i13. On top of being slow, they tend to be poor in terms of block and hit stun. For example, compared to Mitsu/Yoshi A at i10 bs+1 hs+8 or Maxi A at i11 bs+1 hs+10 you can see how Voldo A at i12 bs-1 hs+6 pales. Foundation is the reason why, despite his undeniable strengths and BSFG, he will remain slightly below the upper crust.

In a sense, this sequence was designed to illustrate this, against anyone but Voldo 2AA to 8WRB 3A would not be effective. However, this sequence was also designed to illustrate a highly overlooked strength in Voldo, evasion. On some levels, Voldo is similar to Xiang, his attacks have built in evasion properties that will enable him to slip around interrupt attempts and stay on the offensive. Few attacks in SC can evade the second hit of Xiang/Hwang 8WR 3B, and when you are able to evade that second hit; instead of the third hit, your chances for a back throw are improved.

I choose to open the video with these evasion sequences as a pacing measure, the music here is rather mellow.

Sequence 3: Versus Nightmare (1P)
Command:
1K6, 2B4->BS, BS 66bA, 4[A+B], 8WRB 2K, 4B+K, 3A

What Happens:
You notice from here that the majority of the sequences involve combo follow-through or wake-up demonstrations. Voldo is combo reliant so these sequences are tailored to demonstrate how to make the most out of each combo-initiating tool.

The 1K6, 2B4->BS combo may seem rather weak, however for the damage it trades it opens a world of wake-up opportunities. Common AC methods will make the opponent land immediately on their feet, thus they will fall prey to BS G+A, BS G+B, or other BS based attacks. Since it induces unrecoverable DOS on CH or on crouching hit, it will stun opponents that try to tech roll, as they are considered crouching, and counter waking attacks. More over the BS 66bA evades all low attacks and is completely safe when blocked. If blocked consider countering your opponent’s retaliatory attempts with BSFG. In this case, the BS 66bA hits on CH and Voldo follows with 4[A+B]. Since the 4[A+B] hits late on DOS it connects when the opponent is technically crouching, thus the damage is valued at 102%. The 4[A+B] fully charged is i29 bs+4 hs+6, SCrUB, and guaranteed from the first hit. You could not ask for more in an attack, and you can even vary the speed (4A+B is i16 bs-6 hs+4). From here you would need to anticipate the 8WRB 2K, on hit it yields a hs+8, so Voldo will continue to hold the dominate hand. I chose to break off the series and retreat with 4B+K. Constantly moving out of range with 4B+K is a wise tactic for Voldo, he is stronger from mid range and it will keep your opponent confused.

Notes:
I chose at the end to have the 3A blocked instead of hit, I felt it was more convincing and true to real match footage. Regardless, after you have evaded with 4B+K you should try to punish by mixing 2A+B (against turtles), 66A+BK (against back dashers), 6B (against aggressive opponents), or 3A (against 8WR freaks).

There are a number of subtle details at work here, however I urge everyone to reconsider the strength of 4[A+B] above all else.

Sequence 4: Versus Ivy (2P)
Command:
1K->BS, BS G+B, 4[A+B], 8WRB 3A CH, 236G+A

What Happens:
Voldo lifts with 1K->BS and follows through with BS G+B for an air throw. As stated before, 4[A+B] yields a dominate block stun advantage, 8WR 3A is i14 so Ivy actually lacks the means to interrupt. Once hit on CH, the tech roll is anticipated and countered with 236G+A.

Notes:
I put these sequences back-to-back to reinforce the value of 4[A+B]. Also, every experienced Voldo player knows that the 1K6, G+K combo can only carry you so far, eventually everyone just mashes A as they fall and escapes reliably. Always blend the two throws to maximize your results.

The highlight of this sequence is difficult to notice and benefits arcade users more than DC users. On tall characters, it is possible to guarantee 236G+A when you anticipate the tech roll; outside of jumping right after the tech roll they simply cannot evade in time. I encourage everyone to explore this, especially if your opponents favor taller characters like Ivy or Asta.

Sequence 5: Versus Xianghua (2P)
Command:
214->BS, BS 4B5B, 66G+A+B, left Step, G+B

What Happens:
Everyone should be aware of 214->BS’s ability to evade vertical attacks, however all too often we follow our evasion with BS G+B. BS 4B5B is guaranteed if the first hit connects, from here 66G+A+B is also guaranteed. In this case, the opponent tried to tech roll, 66G+A+B will connect and induce DOS if they do. So, their only option is to stay down and take the hit, few player will readily succumb to this, so you will see a lot of DOS 66G+A+B hits. The 66G+A+B DOS is unbreakable, however few players know this so everyone will try to DOS break, by doing this they will condemn themselves to the left Step BT trap.

Notes:
Almost any hit that downs the opponent near Voldo in a tech-able state guarantees 66G+A+B will hit on DOS when they try to tech roll. BS 66B, 8WR 2_8B, BS 4B5B, 66A, and the list does not stop there! Moreover, to make good even better, 66G+A+B hits downed opponents making it 100% reliable combo material. Damned if they do and damned if they don't.

Oh, and yes, I did capture this several times to ensure I would get the facial close up with the spinning claws.

Sequence 6: Versus Siegfried (3P)
Command:
FC A, 8WRB 2K CH, 66A+B, Freak Stun Cancel, G+A

What Happens:
After a 2A interrupt Sieg is countered with 8WRB 2K. Sieg then wakes attacking into the second hit of 66A+B.

Notes:
While this sequence fails to be applicable or practical, every Voldo player has from time to time landed a second hit CH 66A+B. You can easily induce this from Soul Charge. You can cancel the Freak Stun animation half way with any directional or command input, this grants you enough time to rush in and throw. If your timing is dead on the opponent will rise into BT regardless of how they tech roll, so this is the most reliable BT set-up in the game. You can also cancel the Freak Stun into Soul Charge, this cancel is possible much earlier than the previously mentioned cancel, and if your opponent mashes G they will still tech into BT right in front of you! Imagine nailing them with a SCrUB 6A+B->BS or Soul Charge 66A+B to induce Freak Stun again!

Sequence 7: Versus Kilik (2P)
Command:
GI, 3A+K->MC, MC 66->MC, MC B+K->MC, MC B+K

Notes:
You can also execute this combo as: on side, 3A+K->MC, MC 66->MC, MC B+K->MC, MC 66->MC, MC B+K. This was thrown in here solely to highlight Voldo’s silly combos. Sequence Eight will explain the significance of this more.

Sequence 8: Versus Mitsurugi (1P)
Command:
GI, 3A+K->MC, MC A->BS, BT iFC, WS A CH, 2B4->BS, 2A+K->MC, MC 66->MC, MC K

What Happens:
3A+K->MC garners a bs+13 into MC; MC A is i24 and evades high, MC 66 is i6, MC K is i22. So, we can see that when 3A+K->MC is blocked the opponent must block MC K and only Yoshi’s 2bA (i8) will interrupt MC A. Combine this with the near instant MC 66 and you have one lethal trap.

After the trap is sprung, Voldo uses BT iFC WS A to catch the attacking opponent and induce DOS. 2B4->BS, 2A+K->MC induces the same trap, however this time the opponent turtles and eats the MC 66.

Notes:
As you see, this is another "damned if they do and damned if they don't". Post GI 3A+K is very difficult to rGI, so chances are it will hit or they will block it, either way Voldo has them.

Sequence 9: Versus LizardMan (2P)
Command:
236bA, BSFG, 1K->BS, BT iFC, WS A+B, FC 3A+B

What Happens:
Voldo can 1FS his 236 B into standing A+B as 236bA. Liz blocks this and retaliates in a predicable fashion, this is countered with BSFG and Voldo proceeds to combo. From here, the rare 1K->BS, BT iFC WS combo is demonstrated, the sole purpose here is to show the power of the FC 3A+B SCrUB.

Notes:
I wish I could show a top view of FC 3A+B. FC 3A+B easily hits Steps and 8WR because Voldo flares his arms out at the end, I choose to have Liz Step to demonstrate this and luckily, the camera was cooperative.

Though untested, I consider this set-up effective. Most players will AC away after being hit by WS , this will give Voldo enough space to set-up the SCrUB FC 3A+B.

Sequence 10: Versus Astaroth (2P)
Command:
66A, 236A+B, 66B, BSFG, 66K->BS, BS 2A+K->MC, MC 66->MC, MC B

What Happens:
Voldo GIs the common Asta 3KA trap and forces his way out of the edge with a 66A, 236A+B combo followed by a blocked 66B. The 66B is bs-14, so Voldo must block or GI the incoming Asta 66K, however he is free to respond with BSFG. From here he follows through with Hookin’ Bungaloo’s combo.

Notes:
There are two important factors here, one is to use the Voldo’s attacks wisely for ring control; he is poor at ring outs and should try to fight near the middle. The other element is BSFG. Both Kilik and Voldo should more or less swear off GI all together, anytime you know you will be forced to block an attack that leaves you standing you should attempt to BSFG it.

The combo here is not a combo despite popular belief. However, due to the nature of the human mind just about everyone will eat it. To escape this combo you must not tech roll after the first hit, just take it, and then tech roll to the left after the second hit connects. If you do this MC 66 will turn you on the side and the final MC B will miss. This will also avoid the 66K->BS, MS 2A+K->MC, MC K combo, again, just tech roll to the left only after the second hit and the final K will whiff. With this in mind, perhaps 66G+A+B, 66G+A+B is the best combo after BSFG.

Sequence 11: Versus Kilik (2P)
Command:
1K->BS, BS K, 8WRB 6B+K->CR2, CR2 Cancel, WS A CH, 8WRB 2B, 66G+A+B, left Step, BBB

What Happens:
1K->BS is followed with BS K to ensure wake-up potential. The opponent is then baited with CR Cancel to FC 123 followed by a WS A CH. From here the 8WR 2B, 66G+A+B combo is demonstrated and the sequence is rounded out with a BT tech roll and Voldo’s rare on back BBB.
Notes:

Following 1K->BS with either BS A or BS K is more effective than one may first realize. 1K->BS, BS A_K 236A+B is a good combo for RO, 1K->BS, BS A_K, 236BBB is a good mix up, and 1K->BS, BS A_K, 8WRB 6B+K, CR Cancel throw is a wise pressure blend. When you consider the mix-up potential here you can see how an opponent will be provoked into eating a WS A on CH.

Sequence 12: Versus LizardMan (1P)
Command:
AK, 236A, 236A4A->BS CH, BS 66[A], G+K

What Happens:
This is just a sequence to demonstrate pressuring with 236A to land 236AA or 236A4A on CH.

Notes:
Take a moment to look back at Sequence Three, in that scenario the BS 66bA will hit with the back side arm. From there, it can still induce DOS, but it will leave Voldo in BT. This is the combo you want to do.

Additional Information

Blind Stance Force GI (BSFG) Reference:

Reference the MOTB Section of Kilik's Skill Project for more information on BSFG and MOTB. BSFG is performed under the same circumstances as MOTB, except the command input is 214 instead of 236. In addition, BSFG forces your opponent into a low parry state, versus the high repel state caused by the MOTB. This repel/parry state difference results in the opponent being much closer, therefore increasing your choices of followup guaranteed attacks.

BSFG yields 43 frames of advantage time. I've had the oppertunity to thoroughly test this number and it seems accurate, everything over 43 frames did not connect. Unfortunately, it was difficult to further test this as Voldo lacks attacks that impact between 40 and 49 frames. I used WL B i39 (connected), [A+K] i59 blocked, and 2A+K i52 (crouched). I also tested with 8WR 2B+KG+A (same as 236A+G i40 (connected, side throw, escapeable with A (since it is side throw and not front)). This data corresponds to the recovery time of a successful 1G (the animation the BSFGed characters does is the animation of a successful (not whiff) 1G GI).

Overall BSFG leaves the opponent fairly close in most cases, however there are moments when it will thrust them too far out for some of Voldo's combo. In the rare case that the opponent is pushed too far out use a 66A+BK for 51 damage, in some cases even that may not reach, consider 66B at 47 damage. Up close you can land throws, however Voldo's throws, aside from G+K are not that important. 1K is also possible, however combos from 1K tend to be easily ACed or predicable, such as the case of 1K6, G+K. So the best overall close range BSFG follow through is 66K->BS, BS 2A+K->MC, MC 66->MC, MC B at 103 damage. This combo has drawbacks, unless your constantly mindfull of your ring position you'll easily self RO. This combo is also relatively unreliable on smaller characters, however just 66K->BS, BS 2A+K->MC, MC 66 does 75 damage, so attempting it is always worth it.

Calistro Rush Cancel (CRC) Study:

Visit the CRC Technique Study.

Back Turned iFC Study:

Simply put.... from BT, enter 123 to enter FC.

Musical Score:

Artist : Human Resource
Song Title : Dominator (Beltram Edit)
Albums : Dominator, others...

The first time I heard this track I could not help but see it as the perfect Voldo tune. Besides, circa 1990 techno owns you.

I would be happy to get on my soapbox and tell you how you should support artists and not leech this off Napster, however Human Resource has long since been dead, so the chances of going down to your local store and finding them are nil. In fact, try searching for them on the net and you will turn up empty as well. So, Napster it is.

Creation and Production:

The video as way too long so I had to make the credit roll run a lot faster than I had planned. Let me take a moment to give thanks to everyone in the credits. I really cannot thank Wen heavily enough, his contributions spawned many ideas that developed into the final sequences. And, as always, elk’s assistance proved invaluable.

Assistance:
elk

Contributors:
Wen
Kajisuu

Special Thanks:
Fhwang Sung Kyung

The software used to generate this video were Adobe Premier, Adobe After Effects, and Adobe PhotoShop. After Effects was not as key in this project, the video tricks here were mostly courtesy of Premier. Video was captured in Windows NT on a Pinnacle Systems DC 30 Plus using the cards proprietary software, the source samples were then trimmed down in Adobe Premier then eventually synchronized and composed using Adobe Premier and Adobe After Effects. Audio was attained from Napster at the highest bitrate available. All in all, to complete this project a total of forty-six files consisting of over 2.5 gigabytes were used. The final .avi file was then encoded to .mpg file format using LSX-MPEG Encoder. The final mp-4 version was encoded from the .mpg file using FlasK MPEG.

Since I have learned enough technical bits to keep the videos fresh, I choose the lace this one with artistry by heavily focusing on the music. There are many subtle connections with the music and the sequences. Choosing to heavily edit the throws granted me this freedom.
 

Koz

[10] Knight
KILIK:


Sequence 1:
Command:
MO K, MO A+BG, 2B+K9, FC Aa+bA+B+K, G, 4B

What Happens:
Kilik can do MO K to interrupt a number of strings in SC, a fact most players tend to over look when they slander Kilik's shortcomings. MO K, 66B is guaranteed damage and should be an integral part of any Kilik player's game. I choose to follow the MO K with MO A+BG to 2B+K9; I use this fake often in my personal game-play. It is very WCM sexy. Used in moderation, a fake like this can bait a CH WS KB, mix this fake with MO A+BG, MO K, or MO A+B, 4bK->LR mix ups. This sequence is also in place to demonstrate the speed in which FC Aa+bA+B+K can produce a SCrUB 4B. Overall, this sequence is clearly too outlandish to be applicable in match play, but hopefully it gives potential Kilik users some insights.

Notes:
Unfortunately, while editing this video, I was more concerned with synchronizing the significant sequences with the three primary shifts in the song, rather than concerning myself with the actual order and layout of everything else. This sequence is not a strong opening; in fact, it is probably the weakest sequence in the video. Opening with something weak and then climaxing later probably serves the pace of this video well.

Sequence 2:
Command:
6A, G+B, G, MOTB, 8WR 1B

What Happens:
Kilik uses 6A to strip Mitsu's weapon and promptly follows with a throw, it is actually incredibly difficult to GI. Mitsu GIs with 6G and follows with A+B, I put this in place to show that it is possible to block A+B post 6G GI. After blocking, Kilik uses MOTB on the second hit. The only free hit Kilik can score at this range is 8WR 1B.

Notes:
Well, if you know the first thing about SC or Kilik your jaw is probably on the floor after this sequence. If you are just a mall scrub, then you have no idea why this sequence is significant. Which are you?

Sequence 3:
Command:
44K, aB, 2A, RCC 2A, 8WRB 2ABG, Left Step B

What Happens:
The 44K is used to induce Forced Crouch State, since most WS or attacks possible from this state are fairly linear, aB is effect to shut them down. Once you have countered with aB following with a series of 2As and 8WRB 2ABG is an effective means to control and frustrate your opponent.

Notes:
It is rare to see Kilik in such dominant form; this sequence is believable and representative of a solid Kilik. You will never truly dominate unless you can understand your opponent's reactions.

Sequence 4:
Command:
6AA, 2K, RCC 2A, RCC 3K, MO A

What Happens:
Kilik opens with 6AA, yet cuts it short to poke with 2K, since 2K hits, it is safe to RCC to 2A. Most players react to Kilik's 2A with 2As of their own or WS attacks, in this case, Mitsu responds with 2A and it is countered with a RCCed 3K. Any opponent pressured to this extremely will try to speed their way back to dominance, MO or other similar auto GI attacks are essential to assert Kilik's pressure game.

Notes:
While this sequence is a little too choreographed it is still believable. I hope seeing a sequence like this in motion will inspire Kilik players to try to understand their opponent on a higher level.

Sequence 5:
Command:
MOTB, 8WR 2B, 66A, G+A

What Happens:
Kilik MOTBs Liz's 4B+KG, this leaves Liz at close range and guarantees an 8WR 2B. Anytime Kilik has his back to the edge, the opponent has their back to the edge, or the attack has heavy forward momentum the opponent will be close enough to land an 8WR 2B after MOTB. Landing 66A after 8WR 2B is highly dependant on the location and range of the 8WR 2B, this is one of the rarest combos in SC and fairly unknown to even the more proficient Kilik players. 66A was used due to its ability to allow the opponent to easily AC on to their feet at close range. Anytime an opponent ACs with [G]4; which is possibly the single most common method, they will land on their feet at point blank range setting up the throw.

Notes:
I had hoped to set this as the first demonstration of MOTB, alas synchronizing did not allow it. It is however, an important music shift sequence. I hope to eventually write more articles on the art of wake-ups in SC, it is imperative that one focuses on guaranteed ground damage and wake-ups over combos. The Skill Project videos will stress this point by demonstrating lesser-known combo follow through that leads to advantageous wake-up positioning.

Sequence 6:
Command:
[G]9B, aA, G+K, 4bK->LR, LR 85, A+K, 4kB

What Happens:
The [G]9B yields a dominant advantage on both hit and block stun making it a great set-up for AAB or aAB. [G]9B hits G, induces Force Crouch State and is easily one of Kilik's most important and overlooked attacks. Use it! As planned, this sets up a CH aA, this is followed with a G+K; and a seemingly useless attack is finally put to use. Naturally the aA will have provoked the opponent, the G+K is a perfect tool to position yourself into LR range. Once in LR range Kilik rushes forward, Yoshi reacts typically and does a 2A, this is countered by A+K and sets up the final sequence, 4kB. Any opponent shut down to this extreme is going to fall back on speed to bully Kilik, 4kB should be used in anticipation of this.

Notes:
I love this sequence, it is truly an example of how Kilik should be played. Using spacing blended with pressure and auto GI attacks to out think and control his opponent. I firmly believe anyone with an interest in Kilik can learn something from this sequence.

Sequence 7:
Command:
AAB, 2[G], [G], MOTB, 8WR 6B+K, 66B

What Happens:
AAB is clearly GI bait, however it is still a venerable attack and should be use in moderation by any Kilik player. 1[A] is a wise post GI attack for Night, its speed provokes whiff rGIs easily and even if it is blocked, it yields a dominant block stun that forces the opponent to block a 3B. Once the 3B is blocked MOTB is use followed by a guaranteed 8WR 6B+K, 66B combo.

Notes:
This is a very believable sequence and indicative of MOTB application. Nothing special but it does demonstrate MOTB usefulness.

Sequence 8:
Command:
4G, 4bK->LR, LR 2kA, WLA, 6B+K

What Happens:
It is common to see Yoshi players pressure and pin with the 6B+KBBB. Post GI LR cancels are a wise means to provoke whiffing rGIs. However a seasoned opponent knows this, thus Yoshi blocks the LR 2kA and follows with a 2A interrupt. Most Yoshi players follow 2A interrupts with FC 3K or FC 1KKK, in this case the WL A evades and sets up one of Kilik's most important combos.

Notes:
This is yet another sequence that demonstrates high-level Kilik in a very convincing scenario. WL A, 6B+K is probably Kilik's most important combo when used in moderation, it sets up his other mid launchers and reaches well enough to pressure anyone.

Sequence 9:

What Happens:
I am not going to get detailed here, this is just a silly BT demonstration. All characters can do 7, 8, or 9 inputs in BT to stay in BT. Kilik can do these; in addition, MO attacks. This was just for fun.

Sequence 10:
Command:
MOTB, 8WR 1B, 4bK->LR, LR 3Kka+b+k,G, 1K, FC Aa+bA+B+K, gA

What Happens:
The 8WR 1B is in place to space for the LR 3KK series. Spacing is essential with Kilik and he should use mid range pokes and LR cancels to capitalize on spacing as often as possible. You will notice Asta reacts to the SC with a 6AB, despite this attack's speed the canceled 1K still beats it out and downs Asta in the ideal wake-up position. As I stated in the 1K study, if you interrupt a waking attack, the opponent will rise into BT. In this case, FC A SC cancel to throw is guaranteed with perfect timing.

Notes:
This is the showstopper of the video, the culmination of all of Kilik's most advance tech in a believable and feasible sequence. As it is the focus of the video, it is synchronized with the main shift in the song. It would be nice to say that this sequence was done easily, however it took several hours to perfect.

Sequence 11:
Command:
MOTB, G+A

What Happens:
If Kilik's back is to the edge he will be left close to his opponent after MOTB, you can throw or 3B before your opponent can defend in this case.

Notes:
I designed this to be a solid and believable example of MOTB application. Xianghua cannot crouch in time, but the throw is always escapable.

Sequence 12:
Command:
66B, 4bK->LR, LR 852A, RCC 3B, MO K, G+AxN

What Happens:
66B is one of Kilik's primary interrupt attacks, however all too often people throw away wake-up opportunity for the diminutive damage of an additional 66B. In this case, Mina is tricked by a LR cancel into 2A, and then tricked again by and RCCed 3B. After the 3B, MO K is used to space for the infinite whiff throw sequence.

Notes:
This was planned from the start to be the final sequence, the whiffing throws set up the fade and credit roll nicely.

Additional Information

MOTB Technique Study:

Before discussing the value of MOTB, I will first explain the means to employ it and why it exists.

To execute MOTB just input 236 during a neutral guard state. Since it is risky to rely on Neutral Guard one should be aware that MOTB can be executed as hold [G], receive attack, 236, and then release G, or hold [G], receive attack, release G, 236. In the case of Neutral Guard application, execute 236 during Neutral Guard.

The release of G and the input of the 236 must coincided with the duration of your opponent's impact frames. If your timing is accurate, once the impact frames are over you will cancel the block stun frames into MOTB. This means attacks with longer impact duration and longer block stun duration; such as Asta's 66K, will easily yield MOTB, while attacks like Taki's K; with short impact duration and short block stun duration, are far harder to use MOTB on. MOTB does not work on UBs, throws, SCrUBs, low attacks, or attacks that induce Force Crouch State.

A successful MOTB induces a semi-8WR state upon Kilik; thus, the tweaked animation induced on Kilik can be canceled into 8WR attacks. This cancel is demonstrated throughout the video.

Once you have explored MOTB, you may consider Kilik "broke". However, once you try it in serious match play you will find a number of points that hamper it. First, fast characters that dominate at close range will continue to do so, it is just too hard to MOTB in these cases. Second, MOTB works because Kilik can pre-buffer MO during his opponent's attacks, this pre-buffering cancels the attack into a MO GI state while Kilik is canceled into a semi-8WR state; any error in timing will put Kilik in MO after blocking and completely vulnerable. Third, reliance on a technique like this will see the player guarding considerably more, waiting equates to death in SC and considering the number of attacks that do not work with MOTB it is foolish to rely on it. While MOTB will increase Kilik's overall prowess it by no means "breaks" him, however used in moderation it can be an effective tool to raise Kilik's overall ranking.

Additional Notes on MOTB: MOTB yields 47 frames of advantage time, unfortunately since Kilik is thrust in to 8WR immediately or his opponent may be thrusted away from him, there isn't much he can do with it. However 8WR 1 is guaranteed from just about any situation for 55 damage. To further prove this point, if you cancel immediately into 8WR 2B+K it will connect everytime after an Asta 66K MOTB, the 8WR 2B+K impacts from 39-45 frames, since it is impacting at a distance we can assume the impact is on the later frames. This data corresponds to the total advantage time of a MO GI.

Overall at a distance Kilik should use 8WR 1_7 for 55 damage and while close he should go for 8WR 6B+K, 66B for 63 damage.

Musical Score:

Artist : Orbital
Song Title : Halcyon + On + On
Albums : Orbital 2, Mortal Kombat Sound Track, others...

Honestly, I had an impossible time finding music for Kilik and I do not believe this song suits him at all. I did not originally plan to do Kilik, so unlike the rest of the characters his music was not selected prior to the start of the project. The final candidates for Kilik were Perception by Cass and Slide, Heaven Scent by John Digweed, Tyrantanic by Breeder, and Halcyon + On + On by Orbital. I felt the other tracks up for selection to be too dominate and unrepresentative of Kilik, so the softer and more generic Halcyon + On + On was chosen.

If you like this song you may like other tracks from Orbital, leeching .mp3 files is certainly convenient, however people should do their utmost to support music they enjoy so the artist can continue to produce music. That and .mp3 files compress the high-end treble and bass essentially cutting out chunks of the music, though few people own audio equipment fine enough to discern the subtle differences.

For those interested you can find Orbital CDs for sale at: http://www.cdnow.com/

Creation and Production:

First, let me extend my thanks to elk, his help made this possible.

The software used to generate this video were Adobe Premier, Adobe After Effects, and Adobe PhotoShop. I am still learning Adobe After Effects and it shows, I used this video to learn more about the program for future Skill Project releases, hopefully by then the work will not seem so amateurish. Video was captured in Window NT on a Pinnacle Systems DC 30 Plus using the cards proprietary software, the source samples were then trimmed down in Adobe Premier then eventually synchronized and composed using Adobe Premier and Adobe After Effects. Audio was attained from the source CD via Music Match Jukebox. All in all, to complete this project a total of 43 files consisting of over 2.5 gigabytes were used. The final .avi file was then encoded to .mpg file format using LSX-MPEG Encoder.