Nightmare General Discussion/Q&A Thread

GreatOne1939

I Knew It!!!
So I'm going to be putting any and all information that I've found for each character in their respective threads until the time comes that we have proper sub forums for each SC II character. I've found a lot of information for most characters including combo lists, Soul Charge move enhancement lists, and even some video tutorials for certain characters. We also have frame data for all but 5 of the characters but as of now they are in the old format so it may be a little different and harder to understand. There are plans to put this data in the wiki sometime in the near future so please be patient and just use what you can for now. Now all of this information is dated and may not all be 100% accurate. Some of the same information may also be repeated through out the guides that I've found so once again please be patient and just take what you can use. If you are an "O.G." and have something of substance to add whether correcting bad information or just an added explanation to what is posted, please by all means tell us what you know.

Also, ONE FINAL REMINDER, this is just what you can call a beginners guide. A way for newer people to maybe practice some things with an old SC2 copy before SC2HDO comes out this fall or a refresher for those who have played the game before but forgot some of the basics after all these long years. I'm just attempting to gather what information we do have out there and stay ahead of the curve for when this game is released.

NBS Night Behind Stance (B+K)
NBSR Night Behind Stance while Running (8WR [6] B+K or 6[6] from NBS)
NLS Night Lower Stance (4B+K)
NSSR Night Side Stance Right (2B+K on 1st player side)
NSSL Night Side Stance Left (8B+K on 1st player side)

A6
-4B (59)
-8WR 3_9 (49) Ends in NBS.

66A
-2A+B (86) Can be teched to opponent's left only.
-4B (77)
-8WR 3_9 (68) Ends in NBS.

CH 3A
-4B (61)
-8WR 3_9 (54) Ends in NBS.

4A
-8WR 3_9, NBS B (120) Does not launch on shallow hit.
-A+G_B+G (108) Only if opponent's back is to the wall. Throw can be escaped.
-4B (87)

3 or 8WR 3_9 (Does not launch on shallow hit)
-NBS B (67) Does 65 if 3,B is used.

44
-NLS A+B (82)

WS
-NBS B (60) Reliable only on CH, or if opponent is crouching.
-NBS K (44) Ends in NBS.

WL
-NBS B (63)

BT B
-8WR 3_9, NBS B (115) Must connect on opponent's back or side.
-8WR 3_9 (60) Ends in NBS.

CH 6K
-3A+B (50)
-8WR 3_9 (47) Reliable on shallow hit.

44K
-B6, 8WR 3_9 (79) Ends in NBS.

NBS B
-8WR 3_9, NBS B (123) Must connect on opponent's back.
-8WR 3_9 (66) Ends in NBS.

NBSR B
-B6, 3 (93) Only if opponent's back is to the wall, with no wall stun.
-8WR 3_9 (73) Ends in NBS.

NSSL [A+B] or NSSR [A+B]
-NSSL K or NSSR K (64)

NSSR B or NSSL B
-8WR 3_9 (65) Ends in NBS.

NSSR or NSSL
-NBS B (68)

NLS [A]
-NSSR K (52) Only if opponent's back is to the wall or edge.

NLS K
-B6, 1K (56)
-8WR 3_9 (53) Ends in NBS.

NLS [K]
-NSSL A,2A (74) Reliable only on shallow hit.

-NSSL (56) Ends in NBS.

SC lvl.1
-B4 (GB)
-44B (GB)
-44 (GB)
-Night Side Stance A+B (GB)
-Night Side Stance [A+B] (GB)
-Night Reverse Side Stance A+B (GB)
-Night Reverse Side Stance [A+B] (GB)
-Night Lower Stance A+B (GB)

SC lvl.2
-6B (GB)
-6B:B,B,B (GB)
-3A+B (GB)

SC lvl.3
-B4 (SCUB)
-2A+B (SCUB)
-66B (SCUB)
-4 (SCUB)
-1B (SCUB)
-44B (SCUB)
-44 (SCUB)
-66kB (SCUB)
-Night Lower Stance A+B (SCUB)

-Night Lower Stance 6B (SCUB)

Regular & 8WR Moves

i12 = K
i13 = 3K / 66K / 33_99K
i14 = 6A
i15 = 6K / 2K / 1K / 4K
i16 = A_B+G / b6 / A+B
i17 = A / 3A / 2A / 88A / 3B / 33_99B
i18 = 22A / 11_77K
i19 = 33A / bgB
i20 = 22_88K / A+K
i21 = agA / 236K
i22 = 99A / 2B
i23 = B / 22_88B
i24 = a6 / 1B / 66A+K
i25 = 6B
i26 = 22_88bgB
i28 = 66A / 11_77B / 66kB
i30 = 1A
i31 = 4B / 66B
i32 = 4A / 11_77A / 3A+B
i33 = 2A+B
i36 = 44K / b:4
i38 = 6B:B / 44B
i42 = 236[K]
i43 = b4
i47 = 1[A]
i52 = 4
i57 = 236B


FC & WS Moves

i14 = WS K / FC K / 6A
i15 = 6K / 4K
i16 = WS B
i17 = WS A / FC A
i19 = FC B+G
i21 = FC B / FC A+G
i25 = 6B
i31 = 4B
i32 = 4A
i38 = 6B:B


Jumping & WL Moves

i22 = 8K
i27 = 8A
i28 = 66kB
i33 = 2A+B
i34 = 8B
i35 = WL 5~G
i37 = WL A / WL K
i43 = WL B
i46 = WL 5~K


Back Turned Moves

lBT = left rear side, opp. step to the right
rBT = right rear side, opp. step to the left

i11 = BT K
i14 = BT 2K
i16 = BT 2A
i18 = BT A
i20 = BT B
i21 = BT 2B


Stance Moves

Stance moves appearing in parenthesis represent base speed when already in stance.

---
i13 = (B*gB)
i15 = (A*gA)

---
Night Behind Stance

i10 = (NBS K)
i13 = (NBS A)
i18 = (NBS B)
i23 = (NBS 1A)
i25 = (NBS 1B)
i29 = (NBS 2A)

i22 = 66B+K~NBSR K
i35 = 66B+K~NBSR A
i37 = 66B+K~NBSR B

i25 = B+K~NBS K
i28 = B+K~NBS A
i38 = B+K~NBS B
i42 = B+K~NBS 2A

---
Night Side Stance

i10 = (NSS K)
i18 = (NSSL b:A)
i19 = (NSSL bA)
i22 = (NSS A)
i25 = (NSS B)
i27 = (NSSR bA)
i29 = (NSS A+B)

i25 = 2_8B+K~NSS K
i37 = 2_8B+K~NSS A
i41 = 2_8B+K~NSS B
i44 = 2_8B+K~NSS A+B

---
Night Lower Stance

i15 = (NLS B)
i22 = (NLS K)
i23 = (NLS 6B)
i26 = (NLS A)
i30 = (NLS A+B)

i34 = 4B+K~NLS B
i40 = 4B+K~NLS K
i41 = 4B+K~NLS A / 4B+K~NLS 6B
i49 = 4B+K~NLS A+B


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Advanced Data
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

There are some moves which show fluctuation in their attack speed - depending on what kind of move they encounter, i.e. faster against linear / downward / horizontal etc.. Some have evasive frames, sway motion depending on position in space / distance to opponent. I haven't had the time to specify against what types of moves what speed applies for the relative attack. But it might already help to understand certain occurrences when trying to reproduce frame data.

6A
i13~i14

8A
i26~i27

99A
i21~i22

22A
i17~i18

1B
i23~i24

2A+B
i33~i34

66A+K
i24~i25

WL A
i36~i37

WL B
i42~i43

WL K
i37~i38

NLS K
i21~i22

lBT 2A
i16~i17

BT B
i20~i21

BT 2B
i21~i22

There are also a number of moves which TC in their impact frame. Those break high horizontal yet ignore most other high hitting move instead of trading hits.

2B
FC B
66B
NBS A
NBS B
NLS B
NLS A+B


Regular Moves

A
H +7~9
B -1~+1

[A]
~NSSR

A,A
H1 +0~2
H2 +4
B1 -10~-8
B2 -6
Special late impact occurs at far / max. range only.

A,A,B
OCB
H -6~-4
C x
B -16~-14

A,A,
~NLS

A,A*B
H -4~-2
C x
B +26~28

A,A*
~NLS

A,2A
H x
B -15~-13

A,2A,A4
NBS

A,2A,A
H x
B -12~-11

agA
H x
B +0~2
Allows for lBT attacks on close block.

a6
H x
B -8

6A
H1 x
H2 -2
B1 -10
B2 -16
Shorter block stun outside KD range.

6[A]
~NSSR

3A
H x
C x
B -15

2A
~FC
OCD
H1 -4
H2 -5
B1 -21
B2 -19
Less damaging, shorter hit stun yet longer block stun at far / max. range.

1A
H x
B -17~-16
Exceptional recovery: non-high hitting attacks of speed i17 or faster cannot be blocked. Attacks of speed i18 cannot be blocked but GId.

1[A]
H x
B -9~-8

4A
H x
B +3~5
Allows for lBT attacks on close block.

4[A]
~NSSL

---
B
OCD
H +2~4
C +6~8
B -8~-6


~NLS

B,B
OCB
H x
B -11~-8

B,2A
H x
B -14~-13

B,2A4
~NBS

B,2[A]
H x
B +2~3

bgB
OCD
H -2
B -12

bg
~NLS

bgB,B
H x
B -23~-22

bgB,
~NBS

b6
OCD
H +1~2
B -7~-6

b4
OCB
H x
B +11~12
SC1
B +37~38

6B
H x
B -18~-12
SC2
B +16~22

6B:B
H -17~-16
B -27~-26
SC2
B +13~14

6B:B: B
H x
B -19

3B
H1 x
H2 -4~-2
B -16~-14
Less damaging outside launch range.

3
~NBS

2B
~FC
OCD
H +6~7
B -3~-2

1B
H1 x
H2 -4~-2
B -14~-12

4B
H x
B -14~-13

4
~NBS

---
K
H +6
B -4

6K
H +2
C x
B -8

3K
OCD
H +2~3
B -8~-7
Hit stun prevents opponent from buffering. Must know exact recovery for earliest retaliation. Premature input or mashing completely prevent attacking for a number of frames = adv. up to +5~6.

3K,K
~FC
H +0
C x
B -10

3K,K,K
H x
B -16~-13

2K
1K
~FC
OCD
H +3
B -9

4K
OCH
H +0
B -10

4K,K
H +3
B -10

4K,[K]~2_8
~NBS

4K,[K]~2_8,6B
OCD
H +1~2
B -9~-8

---
A+B
~NSSR

A+B,A
OCD
H -1~+1
B -17~-15

3A+B
H x
B -17
SC2
B +23

2A+B
H x
B -21~-18

{2]A+B
H x
B -17~-14

A+K
H +9
C +12
B +1

A+K,K
OCD
H +2~3
C x
B -13~-12
Hit stun prevents opponent from buffering. Must know exact recovery for earliest retaliation. Premature input or mashing completely prevent attacking for a number of frames = adv. up to +5~6.

A+K,A
H +9~11
B +1~3

A+K,[A]
~NSSR

A+K,A,A
H +0~2
B -13~-11

A+K,A,A,B
OCB
H -6~-4
C x
B -17~-15

A+K,A,A,
~NLS

A+K,A,A*B
H -4~-2
B +26~28

A+K,A,A*
~NLS

A+K,A,2A
H x
B -8~-6

A+K,A,2A,A4
~NBS

A+K,A,2A,A
H x
B -12~-11


8WR Moves

66A
H x
B -3~+1

33A
H x
B -15~-13

99A
H x
B -19~-17

22A
H +3~4
B -2~-1

22[A]
~NSSL

22A,A
H -3
B -13

22A,[A]
NBS

22A,A,
~NLS

88A
H +2~3
B -11~-10

88[A]
~NSSR

88A,A
H -4
B -14

88A,[A]
~NBS

22_88A,A,B
OCB
H -8~-6
B -18~-16

22A,A,
NLS

22_88A,A,6B
H1 x
H2 -17~-16
B1 -22
B2 -27~-26
Shorter block stun outside KD range.

11_77A
44A
H x
B +3~5
Allows for lBT attacks on close block.

11_77[A]
44[A]
NSSR

---
66B
~FC
H x
C x
D x
B -14~-12
Exceptional recovery: non-high hitting attacks of speed i14 or faster cannot be blocked. Attacks of speed i15 cannot be blocked but GId.

33_99B
H1 x
H2 -1~+1
B -16~-14
Less damaging outside launch range.

33_99
~NBS

22_88B
OCD
H +0~2
B -12~-10

22_88
~NLS

22_88B,B
22_88bgB
OCD
H -5~-4
B -15~-14

22_88B,
22_88bg
~NLS

22_88B,B,B
22_88BgB,B
H -1~0
B -11~-10

22_88B,B,
22_88BgB,
~NLS

22_88B,B,K
22_88BgB,K
H x
B -14

11_77B
H x
B -16~-14

44B
OCB
H x
B -12~-10
SC1
B +18~20

44
NLS

44B,B
H x
B -28~-27

44B,
~NBS

---
66K
33_99K
H -2~-1
B -17~-16

66[K]
~NBS

66[K]~2_8
~NBS

66[K]~2_8,6B
OCD
H +1~2
B -9~-8

66K:K
H +2
B -8

66K,B
H1 x
H2 -4~-2
B -16~-14
More damaging outside KD range.

66K,
~NBS

66kB
~FC
H x
B +3
Allows for rBT attacks at same advantage.
Hold G for easier transition to FC/WS.

22_88K
H +9
C +12
B +1
See A+K series.

11_77K
H +4~5
C x
B -6~-5

44K
OCB
H x
B +3
Built-in moves:
i12 = ~A (= 3A)
i11 = ~[a+G] (= A+G)
i11 = ~[a+B+K+G]~SC1~G
i14 = 2A (= 33A)
i17 = 8A (= 99A)
i23 = ~[a+B+K]~SC1~G~K
i27 = ~[a+B] (= 3A+B)
Special buffer moves occur 5 frames earlier but have the same properties as their regular counterpart.

66A+K
H x
B -16~-13


FC & WS Moves

WS A
H +6~7
B -12~-11

WS [A]
~NSSR

WS A,A*2
~FC
H -2~-1
B -20~-19
Exceptional recovery: non-high hitting attacks of speed i20 or faster cannot be blocked. Attacks of speed i21 cannot be blocked but GId.

WS A,A
H x
B -22~-21
Exceptional recovery: attacks of speed i22 or faster cannot be blocked.

FC A
~FC
OCD
H -4
B -18
Exceptional recovery: non-high hitting attacks of speed i18 or faster cannot be blocked. Attacks of speed i20 and i19 cannot be blocked but GId.

WS B
H x
C x
B1 -16
B2 -19
Shorter block stun and less damaging at far / max. range.

WS
~NBS

FC B
OCD
H +3~4
B -11~-10
Exceptional recovery: non-high hitting attacks of speed i11 or faster cannot be blocked. Attacks of speed i12 cannot be blocked but GId.

FC
~NLS

WS K
H x
B -15~-13

FC K
H +0
B -12
Exceptional recovery: non-high hitting attacks of speed i12 or faster cannot be blocked. Attacks of speed i13 cannot be blocked but GId.

FC A+G
H x
B -12
Exceptional recovery: non-high hitting attacks of speed i12 or faster cannot be blocked. Attacks of speed i13 cannot be blocked but GId.

FC B+G
H x
B -14
Exceptional recovery: non-high hitting attacks of speed i14 or faster cannot be blocked. Attacks of speed i15 cannot be blocked but GId.


Jumping & WL Moves

8A
H x
B -19~-17

WL A
H -12~-10
B -23~-21

8B
OCB
H x
B -10~-8

WL B
H x
B -17~-15

WL
~NBS

8K
H x
B1 -13~-12
B2 -7
Special late impact occurs at max. range only.

7K
H1 -3~-2
H2 +3
B -13~-12
Special late impact doesn't seem to occur on block.

WL K
OCD
H +0~2
B -15~-13


Back Turned Moves

lBT = left rear side, opp. step to the right
rBT = right rear side, opp. step to the left

BT A
H +6~8
B -4~-2

lBT 2A
~FC
OCD
H +5~7
B -4~-2

rBT 2A
~FC
OCD
H +5~7
B -5~-3

BT B
H x
D x
B -1~0

BT 2B
~FC
OCD
H +10~11
B +0~1

BT K
H +5~6
B -5~-4

BT 2K
~FC
OCD
H +5~6
B -4~-3


Stance Moves

---
Night Behind Stance

NBS A
OCD
H -4~+1
B -10~-5

NBS [A]
~NSSR

NBS 2A
NBS bA
H1 x
H2 -16
B -23~-22

NBS 2[A]
~NSSL

NBS 1A
H1 +9~10
H2 +12~13
B1 -4~-3
B2 -1~0

NBS 1[A]
~NSSR

NBS 1A,A
H x
B -15~-14

NBS B
OCB
H x
D x
B -9~-6

NBS 1B
H x
B -6

NBS K
~NBS

NBS K,K
H +1
B -11


---
Night Side Stance Right

NSSR A
H +8~10
C x
B -15~-13

NSSR A,A
H x
B -8~-6

NSSR A,2A
H x
B -17~-16

NSSR B
H x
C x
B -16~-13
Less launch height and damage at far / max. range.

NSSR
~NBS

NSSR bA
H -6~-5
C x
B -25~-24

NSSR A+B
OCB
H +9~11
B -12~-10
SC1
B +26~28
Exceptional recovery: attacks of speed i12 or faster cannot be blocked.

NSSR [A+B]
~NSSL

NSSR K
H x
C x
B -6


---
Night Side Stance Left

NSSL A
H +8~10
C x
B -15~-13

NSSL A,A
H x
B -27~-25

NSSL A,2A
H x
B -16~-15

NSSL B
H x
C x
B1 -16~-15
B2 -34~-33
Less launch height and damage at far / max. range.
Much slower recovery when blocked at max. range.

NSSL
~NBS

NSSL bA
H x
B -19

NSSL A+B
OCB
H +9~11
B -12~-10
SC1
B +26~28
Exceptional recovery: attacks of speed i12 or faster cannot be blocked.

NSSL [A+B]
~NSSR

NSSL K
H x
C x
B -6

---
Night Lower Stance

NLS A
H1 +7~8
H2 +4
C x
B -13~-11
Shorter hit stun at max. range.

NLS [A]
~NSSR

NLS B
H1 +2
H2 +5
B1 -9
B2 -6
Extended block and hit stun at far / max. range.
Less damaging at mid / far range.

NLS
~NBS

NLS 6B
OCB
H x
B -14~-13

NLS A+B
~FC
H x
B -13~-11
SC1
B +23~25

NLS K
H x
B -13

NLS [K]

~NSSL

-Note: The following character guide is long and extensive with a lot of great information. So much so that I couldn't fit it all in this slot. One of our members however had enough forethought to go back and save this off of an older Calibur forum/message board. To see the guide in it's entirety including tables, frame breakdowns for each stance, etc. please check out this link: http://8wayrun.com/threads/nightmare-the-legend-will-never-die.1812/

Frame Traps

This section was provided by TieTYT in the Nightmare Soul Arena. Unless mentioned otherwise, all these are uninterruptible on hit. And also, if a high move is uninterruptible, that only means if it is not being blown by a move with a FC or TC in it. This was tested against Mitsurugi’s i10 A’s and i10 2A’s from other characters. For moves that push out too far for an AA to reach, some faster longer range moves were tested against it. However, what Mitsurugi’s A cannot interrupt, Xianghua’s A sometimes can. If a move has two follow-up moves, it means that either one of them will hit as part of the frame trap, but not both together.

Also, 66K and 2K are the same speed, so any frame trap that ends with 66K can be substituted with 2K in case the opponent learns to block 66K. It can also be followed up with 2K frame traps. However, a 2K will not always reach where a 66K will.

On Hit

22KK, 66K (inconsistent)
22KK, 6A (occasionally clashes with i10 A’s, usually interrupts)
3 (non-lift), NBS A or NBS B
, NLS B or NLS K
WS A, 66K (3B does not work against Xianghua or Taki)
WS [A], NSS A
WS [A], NSS B (may not work against Taki or Xianghua when deep)
NSS A, 66K or 3B
NSS A+B, 3B
A, 3B or 66K
B6, K
NLS A, 3B
NLS , NBS K or NBS A
2K, 66K
2K, 6A (clashes with Mitsurugi’s and Voldo’s i11 A’s and Xianghua interrupts it)
ag[A], NSS K
CH ag[A], NSS A (second hit CH, clashes with i10 A’s, interrupted by Xianghua)
NBS [A], NSS K
NBS K, NBS A or NBS B
NBS K, NBS K (only reaches when the opponent’s back is to a wall)
CH A+K, 3B
22, NLS B or NLS K
22B, NLS B (least advantage on hit of series)
22BB, NLS K
22BB, NLS B (it cannot be stepped on hit)
K, 66K
K, 3B (breaks most fast characters’ A’s but is interruptible by Xianghua)
bg, NLS B or NLS K
22bg, NLS B or NLS K
22bgB, NLS B or NLS K
NBSR A, 3B
NBSR [A], NSS K (this even interrupts Xianghua’s or Mitsurugi’s 2A’s)
22A, K
22[A], NSS K
Side throw, 3B
A+G, 3B (doubtful that this can be GI’ed)

On Block

[A], NSS K (on block and hit)
b4, 3B
44K, 66K



Miscellaneous Strategies

All of the information here can be found in the Nightmare Soul Arena. I merely put it all together for the sake of completeness.

Data on Roulettes

This section was produced mainly by WCMaxi and edited by many others.

There has been confusion over Nightmare’s roulettes, so here is some clarification and data on them.

In the case of entering a stance naturally, iFC is possible. For example, B+K2G~WS K. However, iFC is not possible from a move that ends in a stance, aside from the exception of 6B~4B+K. This however can work with roulettes. Basically, roulette to stance and you can then iFC.

Therefore, the issue becomes the nature of Nightmare’s roulettes themselves. They have been dropped for several reasons. You have to input them with precise timing; failure in doing so results in the stances’ B or K coming out. However, 1FS bends the rule of the game. So, by inputting [kB](direction), you can pre-buffer the stance shift with no event of error.

The other end of this is NSSR. It can produce stance-based attacks long before Nightmare is in the actual stance itself. If you compare this with NSSL A or K, the difference is rather notable. By combining this with the 1FS roulette iFC you can get interesting effects. The following two examples should show you. You have to do several WS ’s back to back for the first one in order to see the effect.

(WS -> NBS, 2[kB] -> NSSR, 2G) x N (where N denotes the number of times you try). Do this right and you will never see anything that looks like a crouch.

WS -> NBS, 2[kB] -> NSSR, NSSR K. Done right, the boot just comes out.

This is an effective way to lure more NSS CH Ks and more FC tactics from spins and roulettes.

As a note, buffering 2[kB] is merely an error-free way to get into another stance without having to worry about a stance-based B or K coming out from the next stance. It is in no way faster than if you buffered a stance change the normal way.


Got You Step (GYS)

This section was produced mainly by Lau and edited by many others.

When Nightmare spins into 8WR NSS, he says “Got you”, hence the name.

As a general help, on the first player (1P) side, 8WR 2B+K will go into NSSL and 8WR 8B+K will go into NSSR. The glitch works for both sides but it works better if you are spinning to NSSR (8 for 1P and 2 for 2P). For all examples, 8WR 8B+K is only listed but both sides work.

Basic GYS - Apparently you have additional inputs during the first couple of animation frames of this move, meaning if you do 8WR 8B+K~AAB, you will do the first of the GYS and then execute AAB. This looks like a regular AAB but Nightmare twitches a bit and moves up and says “got you” before executing it. The input of the first A has to be extremely fast for this to work. Basically you can do any standard move if you are fast enough. If you do 8WR 8B+K~A+K, it will come out either a normal A+K or a 8WR A+K. Which move comes out appears to be dependent on the frame you input the second move at. However this is unconfirmed.

Advanced GYS - First you can go into NBS from GYS, to do this do 8WR 8B+K~B+K~B+K. You will do around 2 GYS before going into NBS. If done properly, Nightmare will say “Got, got, got”.

Multi-GYS (MGYS) - Basically you will see a Nightmare that appears to be on crack (it has been described as spazzing out). He wants to spin but you are not letting him, and he is moving to the side very quickly while saying “Got, got, got...”. Nightmare must not spin; if he does it is being done wrong or the inputs are too slow. It is quite fast and if done next to your opponent you will easily get behind him. The problem is it is very hard to control. To do MGYS do 8WR 8B+K then mash 8 and B+K together. This has to be done really very fast. Any moves from MGYS will seem to come out of nowhere. It is difficult to get non-NSS moves out of MGYS, so aiming for a NSS move is better when you do it.

There is another glitch to GYS but it is not exactly GYS. In NSSR or NSSL hold the direction that moves to the other stance while mashing B+K. This makes Nightmare start spazzing in the current stance you are in while moving. Basically, Nightmare wants to change stances but you are not allowing him to. NSSR to NSSL moves backwards and NSSR to NSSL moves forward; however, the movement is slow. However, NSSR -> NSSL followed by NSSR bA is good for creating a lot of space in a hurry.


Transition to NSS (TNSS)

This section was produced mainly by TieTYT and Lau and edited by others.

If you do 88_22B+K pay very close attention to his sword. You’ll notice that it seems to glitchily change positions between a frame from facing one way to facing another way.

Believe it or not if you do moves in this transition they have different properties. This transition has been given its own name: transition to NSS or TNSS for short. TNSS B_ comes out much faster than a normal NSS B but it only seems to do so when it whiffs or just barely reaches. TNSS B~A does not exist; if you do B~A you will get NSS A. If you do [b~A] you will get NSS [A+B]. You also seem to be in a semi-TNSS state after you do NSS [A+B]. NSS b~A also does not exist in this transition. The B however appears to be the same in this state.

The importance of TNSS B is actually very different from NSS . As it is well known, NSS on block leaves you at frame disadvantage and makes you vulnerable to AA/BB which you must 2G in order to block. However, TNSS leaves you at frame advantage making NSS K as a follow-up uninterruptible on block. This is only when the opponent is within range, either at a wall or the ring’s edge. TNSS A is also very difficult to interrupt when you also add in the regular TNSS pushing the opponent back. This throws off your opponent thinking that he can interrupt you when he actually cannot. He might find out eventually but this leads to mix-ups on your part.

You cannot pre-buffer roulettes from this. You can sort of pre-buffer NLS, but NBS and the opposing NSS result in NSS B.


NBSR & NBSR2

This section was produced solely by Lau and then edited and added to by many others.

One of the new features for Nightmare in SoulCalibur II is the ability to do 8WR while in NBS. It has been termed Night Behind Stance Running (NBSR). Here are a few ways to get into NBSR:

- While you are in NBS, simply 8WR. This is the most basic way.
- 66B+K will make Nightmare run forward while going into NBSR, and it does not seem to have any delay for any NBSR move. For example, doing 66B+KB will make Nightmare do a NBSR B near immediately from neutral.
- While in NBS, buffer any direction, although 8 seems to be the most effective. Some moves do not come out when you buffer 2 or 4.
- While in 8WR, do 6B+K and it goes into NBSR smoothly. Nightmare does not stop to go into the stance, he just puts his sword behind him while running. NBSR moves can be done immediately.

As regards NBSR2, this is a different sort of NBSR. The difference is that with NBSR2 you have no access to NBSR moves, yet you are in the same running motion as NBSR. This means that if you hit B while in NBSR2, NBS B will come out instead of NBSR B.

You cannot roulette from NLS to NBSR2, it can only be done from NSSR or NSSL. To access NBSR2 hit 6B+K while in either of the mentioned stances. The reason this is good is because you appear to be in NBSR while in actual fact you are not, meaning you can execute NBS moves instead of NBSR moves. You can still access NBSR moves while in NBSR2. Simply 8WR in another direction and you will execute any normal NBSR move (for example, NBSR2 8AA will give you NBSR AA.

If you execute 6B+K from just executing 2B+K (NSSL) however, you will go into NLS. This must be done during the animation for it to go into NLS. If it is done after the animation, NBSR2 comes out. Any move that goes into either NSSR or NSSL will go into NBSR2 when you hit 6B+K.

From NLS, hit 6B+K to go into NBS. The special part about this is that you can hold B+K and just tap forward and Nightmare will go into NBS.

If you want to get from NLS into NBSR2, roulette to NSSR and go into NBSR2.

Every 6A+B NBSR begins as NBSR2. There is a split second after beginning NBSR where B and A will act as NBS B and NBS A. After that time period they will be NBSR B and NBSR A. Rouletting into NBSR from NSS appears to make this window longer.

There is a stutter in Nightmare’s running animation when this transition from NBSR2 to NBSR takes place. Any attack after this stutter will be a NBSR attack; any before will be a NBS attack. The stutter does not happen for quite a while after rouletting from NSSR to NBSR but it does happen. Run in NBSR2 long enough and it becomes NBSR.

You can cancel NBSR or NBSR2 and do a GI near immediately. Move into NSS and do 6b+kgg, which will translate as Nightmare doing a repel from NSS (4b+kgg does a parry). However, this only appears to be faster and therefore is a mere technical aspect.


Crouch Throws

This section was produced by TieTYT and edited by others.

From the frame data provided it can be seen that FC A+G (crouching A throw) is very safe on block, while FC B+G is not. And you can GI out of their recovery animation, meaning that after your crouch throw is blocked you can immediately GI instead of having to wait for their recovery animation. However due to the unsafe nature of FC B+G, FC A+G is a better setup for a GI against the opponent. The crouch throws also have a special low property that makes mid hits whiff for a few frames. Both throws also have RO properties, so keep that in mind near a ring edge. Such throws can be broken like any normal throw, but do a TER to get enough frame advantage for any of the following free moves - 6A, K, FC K, 3K or 66K.


B:4

This section was produced by EvilDice and supported by Lau, Leva and others.

The normal way of doing b4 can now be replaced by a faster version. Doing B~4 (or B 1FS 4) makes it come out faster. On GC-L1 b4, B:4 will connect. A way to try and do it consistently is to look at his hand. Once it moves, hit 4. There is apparently a window to hit that 4 such that it cancels the startup animation and becomes B:4.


agA and bgB Buffer

This section was produced by Srayer.

Both agA and bgB have been slowed down since SoulCalibur. You have to wait a second before inputting G~A_B, or else the move will not come out.

The first way to do it quickly is to execute A~G 1FS A or B~G 1FS B. They will come out almost immediately.

The second way is to buffer the attack into a guard. While holding G, press A (release G after that) G~A or A (release G after that) G 1FS A. The second execution is preferable and the execution for B works as well. Doing this buffer completely eliminates the cancel animation from these two moves. It also works if you buffer the first A or B into the ending animation of another move, but it is not quite as useful as the G buffer.


Back Turned Just Frames

Nightmare does have some BT JF’s. They may not look like it, but it is most convenient to put them as BT JF’s.

There are several ways to do BT JF’s.


4A (blocked up close)

Have a 4A blocked close and you will get to perform your next move as a BT move at the same advantage.


agA (blocked up close)

This is executed the same way as 4A on block.


66kB (grounded)

Though grounded, you will do a BT move on wake-up.


[2]A+B (grounded)

You need to hold 2 to remain in grounded position. The BT move is executed on wake-up.


4AG

Do a 4A, and cancel it just as soon as he says anything. In the American version, cancel when he says “Die”. Then perform the BT move of your choice immediately.


4BG

Do a 4B, and cancel it just as soon as you see the light at the tip of his sword flash. Then perform the BT move of your choice immediately.


General Information (Moves)

Nightmare is a character with the ability to punish characters who sorely underestimate his ability to dish out damage. It is for the same reason that some have given up on him. Though a ranged character in general, Nightmare has the ability to space, but has problems against the faster lock-down characters. With severe limitations in his general strategies, Nightmare players may hit a ceiling after learning him for some time. This can be easily attributed to many’s failure to understand how Nightmare can be played.

Here are some generalizations for most of his moves, though not all. These moves can be either often or rarely used, and their effects can be generalized in a small summary. I must stress however, that no matter what you read in this FAQ, you will only be seeing a part of the move’s effect. In order to use them efficiently, you must see where you can put the moves in your own style of play and not follow to this FAQ dogmatically. Be flexible. Adapt the usage of these moves best to the way you play, and the way you play to the way you think you can play to win.


Throws

FC A+G (i21, slightly unsafe on block; super TC; B+G variant is i19 but more unsafe; RO’s in front)

Nightmare has a great crouch grab in his arsenal. Done in FC, both of his variants have 6 frame breaks but are rather obvious. However, they have a TC property that makes them go under even Taki’s EX UB and Maxi’s 6A+B. This makes it a good move and also RO’s in front of Nightmare. Since FC A+G is safer, usually using it gives enough results. However, you may wish to mix it up with FC B+G, even though it is more unsafe, in case a player knows and can break crouch grabs.

On a grounded opponent whose head is towards you, a crouch grab will bring them standing. They can be brought standing facing you (FDFA) or away (FUFA). On any other type of grounded position, the grab will do 6 points of damage.


A Attacks

His normal A attacks are considered to be slow and very unsuccessful. However, some of his best moves are high horizontal A’s, while some of his good mids are also A’s.


agA (i21, safe on block; RO’s to Nightmare’s left)

One of his core moves, it is a little difficult to execute for the non fleet-of-finger. The trick to it is to do aG~1FS~A. This executes the second A at 1 frame shift. With the G-buffer strategy as well, agA becomes a very viable option for a fast counter to knock the opponent away.

Why is it useful? For one, the cancel animation for the first may fool opponents into either a GI or block. With a whiffed GI, the opponent is still hit away. With a block, the opponent will usually attack immediately thinking that you are at frame disadvantage. However, being safe on block, this can lead to a 3 CH for 70+ damage. A good trap however must be set up and used only occasionally.

When this move is blocked up close, BT JF attacks can be executed out of it. This can set up further follow-ups and frame traps with BT moves.

It should be noted however that if you cannot do it consistently, using it often is not a good idea. You will end up doing a single A instead. Therefore, practice consistently to be able to apply this move in a game, and remember never to use it too often. The opponent can still duck it if he anticipates the move and then get a free hit off a whiff by you.


6A (i13 ~ -14, unsafe on block; RO’s to Nightmare’s right)

One of Nightmare’s faster moves, 6A is great for catching opponents unawares. This move is however very unsafe on block and can allow Nightmare to punished badly when whiffed. It is -10 when blocked up close and -15 at maximum range, allowing the fastest A’s like Taki, Xianghua and Talim to get off at least an AA NC, and maybe further frame traps. Cassandra can get off a 236B at maximum range with AG. This can lead to adverse yomi against Nightmare. 6A must never be used too much; it should be thrown out only as one of the last resorts to throw a character out from lock-down range, or to RO an opponent to his right quickly.


4A (i32, slight advantage on block)

Amongst his slower moves, 4A is hardly used for its speed by many inexperienced Nightmare players. However, this would mean taking away an option that can lead to a 50% string at close to mid-range, or a bait for either a re-GI or CH.

At a close to mid-range hit, 4A gives Nightmare a guaranteed 50% string with a 3 -> NBS -> NBS B (this will in future be referred to as 3B for convenience) follow-up. This does not require a CH to pull off. It deals 118 damage on a normal hit and 140 on CH.

Post-GI, this move can be good for a re-GI happy opponent, leading to the 50% string discussed, with a whiffed GI. It can also be canceled for G2 or cautious opponents, causing more mix-ups and still allow Nightmare to be considerably safe at the same time. This can also lead to a BT JF for Nightmare, though the only option out of BT would be BT B for its guaranteed follow-ups on hit and its FrC property. On close block, iBT attacks are also possible.

Being slightly advantaged on block, this is good to lure more CH 3’s for opponents that think you are disadvantaged when blocked, or roulette to NSSL (4[A]) and use NSSL K if you think the opponent knows about the slight advantage and may be cautious in attacking hastily. This leads to a good punishing opportunity for Nightmare.


2A (i17, unsafe on block)

Though it may be despised as a low move, 2A is actually very good as a relatively faster low poke. It is able to bail Nightmare out of many mid-range situations where that last poke is needed to finish off an opponent. It must never really be used at close-range or if the opponent is anticipating a low. It is also quite unsafe on block, with more block stun at close range. It is still at frame disadvantage for Nightmare even on hit and so should never be used rashly, though it can be used as a good bait for a CH on a fast move if you think you can pull it off.


33A (i19, unsafe on block; RO’s to Nightmare’s right)

Positioning his sword like an oar paddle, Nightmare can hit an unsuspecting opponent far away enough for a buffered 66B+KB (iNBSR B) as a guaranteed follow-up. It is also good as part of a mid/low mix-up. Though generally relatively unsafe, the options it can give Nightmare on a mid-range hit or a close-range CH is good food for thought, leading to either a good yomi, or okizeme.


99A (i21 ~ i22, unsafe on block; RO’s to Nightmare’s left)

99A appears faster on startup but is actually a little slower than 33A. Being harder to spot, it is also great as a mid/low mix-up at either close or mid-range. It is however more unsafe on block than 33A. Use it wisely.


1A (i30, i47 when held fully; unsafe on block, but less so when held fully; RO’s to Nightmare’s left)

Though a low, 1A is very slow on startup and it is usually only good post-GI, or to bait a whiffed GI by varying the speed of the hit coming out at different timings held for the move. This can screw up a GI timing. However, being rather unsafe, this most must, at beset, only be used occasionally or even rarely. It does give a rather large RO to Nightmare’s left however, and even more when held fully.


3A (i17, unsafe on block; auto-GI’s highs and mids from frames 8-12; RO’s to Nightmare’s left)

Even though it comes with an inbuilt auto-GI property, 3A has rather bad block stun, and on hit will only RO a short distance to his left. On CH, it induces a CS that cannot follow with a 3 launch. The best follow-up is 4B. When the opponent is auto-GI’ed, he is immediately hit with an unbreakable and inescapable throw that has horrendous damage and not as good an okizeme as opposed to some other moves that Nightmare has.


88AA (i17, gets more unsafe on block with the second A; slight advantage on hit for first A; NC)

This is one of Nightmare’s best 8WR moves. While sweeping the sword out to range, Nightmare steps to his left. The first A has an option to go into NSSR by being held, the second A into NBS by being held, or the move can be finished with a slow B, a held B to go into NLS, or 6B to thrust the sword out to range for spacing. However, it is unwise to use B unless you wish to bait a GI after using 6B the first time round. Moreover, it is better to stop at the second A as 88AA is an NC. You can also go into NBS and use 2G to remain safe should the need arise, or use NBS as a follow-up tactic.

88AAB__6B is not an NCC. The second A can be GI’ed or auto-GI’ed by some moves. It can be delayed for such contingencies on block. It is effective for spacing as well as an escape. However, both hits are high only.


22AA (i17 ~ i18, safe on block; gets more unsafe with second A on block; slight advantage on hit for first A; NC)

This is a variation of 88AA, but has the exact same damage. However, it is safe on block and has slightly more advantage on hit with the first A than the above-mentioned. If the first A is held, NSSL will result; the second A goes into NBS and the follow-ups are the same as 88AA. Both hits are still high only.


[A] -> NSSR (i18, slight advantage on block; better advantage on hit)

Though not generally considered as a viable move, [A] -> NSSR is a good bait for a CH NSSR K. This is good due to the NSSR’s glitch where a move can come out before Nightmare is in the stance itself. Certain traps can thus be set for NSSR options, such as stepping a vertical with NSSR B, or getting a frame trap off NSSR A, should the opponent block high in anticipation of a NSSR K. If the opponent ducks, NSSR A+B is always a viable option. It also has the ability to go into NSSL if held. Sometimes, canceling NSSR immediately also helps for setting up a throw. However, one should keep in mind the advantage on block and attempt to make use of it if possible.


66A (i28, safe on block)

Though it may not generally seem like a good move to some, it can be used to catch unsuspecting rushers or to space a little. Being safe on block, this move can be however easily ducked and punished. Never use it in haste and only use it occasionally. It can also be used post-GI only if you think the opponent will re-GI, but there are other better options for a post-GI game.


A2AA (i18, unsafe on block; only a little less unsafe on block with last A)

Though this move may seem like one that is used by new Nightmare players only, it does have use, though only rarely. The last A can be canceled by inputting 4 right after you input A, and the second and third hits are low. It has a mix-up into NBS or allowing the third hit to go all the way through. Being a canned string, it must be used with extreme caution.


WS AA (i17, unsafe on block; first A large advantage on hit when held, safe on block)

With the first A being a mid and the second a low, this move may not seem like one that would be used often at first. However, the second hit can be canceled into FC for a FC/WS mix-up. With Nightmare’s available FC/WS arsenal, this can be a good starting move or a move to consistently put pressure on the opponent and keep him guessing. With the occasional and varied use of such a move, it is a core move for Nightmare.

Players can also use the large advantage on hit for the first A being held into NSSR to their own extent.

a6 (i24, safe on block; causes a CS on hit)

Nightmare uses the hilt of his sword to bash the opponent’s face, causing a CS that opponent cannot break out of. On block, this move can knock the opponent a small distance, allowing for a little spacing, and is safe. A 3 follow-up launch is not possible however, so the best follow-up is a 4B on hit.


B Attacks

Some of his most damaging and punishing attacks come from his vertical moves. Though, they may at times seem very linear, yet it is best to utilize the better ones whenever possible.


3 (i17, unsafe on block except with 2G; goes into NBS; TC)

By far one of the best launchers in the game, Nightmare’s 3 is made powerful by its great ability to punish with a follow-up NBS B, and its safeness by the 2G glitch. This makes 3 a very viable launcher with TC frames in its execution. With 70+ damage on a 3 -> NBS -> NBS B (which can be shortened to 3B for convenience after prolonged usage of the term), this is a great way to instantly take nearly one-third of your opponent’s life away. With its safety on 2G, this move can then only be broken by lows or throws. Both can be countered with a NBS K, which is at i10 and a mid. A throw can also be broken. This can be therefore be a mix-up upon 3 on block.

If you should expect your opponent to expect you to 2G, he will therefore either throw or dish out a low. In such a case, NBS K is very handy for a fast counter and an ensuing frame trap. However, it must be thrown out immediately after a blocked 3. Should you expect your opponent to immediately mash any high or mid, then 2G immediately (in order to take advantage, most opponents dish out AA when they block a 3, which, for most A’s, are almost immediate). This should keep you safe from taking unnecessary damage.


WS/WL (i16 and i42 ~ i43 respectively, both unsafe on block; latter is less unsafe; goes into NBS; TC)

A very slightly faster and much slower version of 3 respectively, both of these moves can be very devastating if used properly and mixed with other moves. In the case of WS , in its entire execution frame Nightmare is at least in TC if not FC position. Thus, this gives Nightmare a great advantage. For the case of WL , Nightmare launches as he lands, and this can be mixed up with WL A, which hits low. Both WS and WL go into NBS, which means both are safe by using 2G.


1B (i23 ~ i24, slightly unsafe on block; SCUB; RO’s behind Nightmare)

Most Nightmare players rely on this move to get out of sticky situations at the ring’s edge, where Nightmare is dangerously close to being RO’ed. Hitting mid, this move turns into an AT on a successful hit at close-range. The AT is unbreakable and therefore, the opponent can only watch as he gets RO’ed. Though it is also great post-GI or post-GC, it is still prone to being punished with AG, even though it is only slightly unsafe on block. This move is generally only recommended for either at use out of bad circumstances for Nightmare at ring’s edge, or as an occasional move that can take away a quarter of the opponent’s life on a successful throw. Being a SCUB, this means the opponent must also take note of its usefulness in close with a full SC.


4B (i31, slightly unsafe on block; i52, GC and SCUB when held, goes into NBS; BT JF; RO’s far in front)

As a slow launcher, with the option to hold it for a GC or to G-cancel, 4B is usually only used as a guaranteed follow-up to certain moves on CH. It is also good post-GI, or used to fake an opponent. However its BT JF is more unreliable than 4A’s, and should be used only very rarely, if at all. The G-cancel can be good to bait a GI, by canceling it in mid-motion and then throwing out a fast move such as 6A or 66K to counter what the opponent thinks he can hit you with. Though great for faking, 4B must never be used without careful thought.


bgB (i18, safe on block; i12 if you G-buffer, cutting 6 frames; launches on second hit; NCC for second B or K)

Though a little easier to execute than agA, bgB hits vertical, and has the option to go into a second B or K. bgBK has a very fast kick, and therefore is usually impractical. bgBB launches on the second hit and goes into NBS when the second B is held. Therefore, when it hits as a NCC, bgB -> NBS -> NBS B is a guarantee, with substantial damage. It is not a NC; the second B or K can be blocked.

It is possible but not practical to train your opponent to block only the first B by not allowing the canned string to finish. If he expects no more moves to come out after bgB (after being conditioned), you may throw in the K for a fast counter that RO’s in front of Nightmare. However, both the second B and the K are unsafe on block so use them wisely.


6B (i25, unsafe on block; GC-L2; TC; option to cancel into NLS; RO’s in front)

Good against rushers, 6B has the option to cancel into NLS by a 1FS input of 4B+K. It also TC’s during its entire execution and therefore is a good counter for high A attacks. With average spacing options and being unsafe on block, it also has bad recovery and is rather linear. It should not be used frequently and only if necessary, like when the opponent makes a mistake at range and Nightmare has the chance to punish using 6B, or when Nightmare wishes to fake people out and cancels it into NLS for a NLS mix-up.


66B (i29 ~ i31, unsafe on block; RC; TC; SCUB; goes into FC; evades to Nightmare’s left for verticals)

Often called the newbie’s move for Nightmare, it evades verticals but does not track after it has begun. It is rather unsafe on block but can push opponents a little out for spacing. However, this can be countered with AG. Even on a frontal hit, nothing is guaranteed. If stepped, the consequences can be disastrous for Nightmare. If used too often, Nightmare will not be able to have any initiative. It is best used when Nightmare wakes up immediately, or when a mid-range punishing opportunity arises.

When buffered into the end of a slow and unsafe move, the startup may be able to evade and punish the opponent’s attack. However, this move must never be relied on as there are other moves and factors that can be considered.

Nightmare can be left in FC by this move, causing a FC/WS mix-up should the opponent fail to immediately attempt to punish or react when they block the move. It is also a SCUB, the most common one for Nightmare. Therefore, never be too predictable with this move.


11_77B (i28, unsafe on block; RO’s at mid-range; spaces; evades a little to right)

This move is very obvious even when buffered, though it attacks low and can RO an opponent at a moderate range. Being unsafe on block and with AG, it can be punished easily. It evades only a little to his right and Nightmare takes a step back while executing the move. Though it may be moderately useful when buffered or at mid-range distance from the ring’s edge, it is best to use this move very sparingly.


B2A (i23, unsafe on block; safe on block if the A is held; can be canceled into NBS)

This move may not generally seem like a move that should be used frequently. The second hit can however both be held or canceled. This makes it a small mix-up of its own, between canceling into NBS and hitting the opponent with a fast NBS K if he guards low, or allowing the second hit to flow through and connect should he be conditioned to guard high or attempts to attack. Should you hold the A, the spacing provided plus its safeness on block should give you more options from there.


_2 -> NLS (i23, safe on block; very slight advantage on hit)

Moving into NLS gives Nightmare options off a mid/low mix-up, and doing it from a or FC 2 can make the opponent think on blocking either high or low. Though not generally recommended for use, occasional dishing may work in Nightmare’s favor, though there is certain to be little advantage.


22_88BB (i23, unsafe; first B is neutral on hit; second B is very slightly unsafe on hit; option to follow up with B,
or K; option to go into NLS with any B that is held; NC for first two B’s)

Another of his 8WR moves that can be sorely underestimated at times, 22_88BB can surprise an opponent when
used well. With any of the B’s going into NLS when held, and the ability to mix up the third B with a K, the
opponent can be kept guessing with the correct and well-planned application of this move. The first two B’s are also
a NC. However, players should take note that it is not a NCC for any of the third hits. The K option also RO’s on hit
in front of Nightmare, but is unsafe on block.

This move is also good when mixed with 22_88AA. It basically can cover both spacing and close-in situations to a certain extent when these two moves are mixed correctly and well-planned. However, this move is very linear and can be stepped. It is also not wise to always end the canned string with either a B or K. This will all work to Nightmare’s disadvantage.


22_88bgB (i26, unsafe on block; can end with B or K; second B is neutral on hit; any held B goes into NLS)

Akin to 22_88BB, this move can be a little harder to execute but can also fool the opponent when used together with the former. The two B’s are not a NC, but both enders for the move are NCC’s.


44B (i38, unsafe on block; GC-L1; SCUB; TJ; held B goes into NLS; option to end with another B, if this one is held it goes into NBS and launches on hit, also tracks before it starts)

Nightmare jumps high and then brings his sword down in a great slashing motion for this move. With it being both a GC-L1 and a SCUB, Nightmare has options with a GC, as 44B can follow up with a B-ender for a launcher that can go into NBS when held, or move into NLS by holding the first B. Both these enders give Nightmare options off mid and low mix-ups. However, the move is very slow and easily evaded, and the second B tracks only a little before it starts. Good for closing distance and escaping lows, it is nevertheless rather unsafe due to the reasons stated.


b6 (i16, safe on block; very slight advantage on hit and CH)

b6 may seem like a fast move, and it is. However, it is very linear and should only be used to punish in-close fighters like Talim. b6 is also a good way to get out of sticky lock-down situations for Nightmare. On hit, it only gives very slight advantage to Nightmare. Infrequent use is advised at best.


b4 (i43, advantage on block; FrC; GC-L1; SCUB; 1FS execution B:4 is i36)

Great for post-GI games, b4 is also a GC-L1 and a SCUB. Though slow, its main strength lies in its GI-baiting ability as well as its high damage factor. B:4 is executed at 1FS and cuts out 7 frames of execution, and therefore is slightly faster. On a GC, another B:4 can crush a re-GI easily. This move can only be used wisely and sparingly even with the large advantage on block. This is so that opponents do not easily wise up to the move and step its slowness.


K Attacks

Nightmare may not have a good kicking ability, but he does have some good K attacks that Nightmare players can take advantage of to gain the upper hand in combat.


66K (i13, highly unsafe on block; option to hit a B or a held B to go into NBS; 66K -> NBS -> NBS B is a NCC; 66kK possible and a NC/NCC; TC; 66[K] goes into NBS and can change direction going into NBS by hitting either 2 or 8)

One of his best attacks, 66K gives Nightmare a great NCC with the follow-up B’s ability to go into NBS (look at above for the NCC). It hits at a fast speed, and has a TC property, meaning it can beat out any A-spamming in-close fighters. Though most Nightmare players do not use the slide input follow-up K, it is also possible to use it for spacing. However, 66kK is unsafe on block while 66K can be made safe by 2G from NBS. It is also possible to use 66K alone as the opponent may continue blocking after that in fear of the follow-up B. This can be a mix-up on its own, albeit not that useful. However, the options given on CH alone will make opponents fear this move when it is used wisely.


6K (i15, generally safe on block; on hit gives slight advantage and spaces a little; on CH it guarantees a 4B)

Though it may look like a cool move to use, 6K has its advantages and disadvantages. On block it is rather safe (not even an i10 A can hit) and on CH it knocks the opponent far away and guarantees a 4B. It also RO’s rather far in front of Nightmare. Hitting mid, this move is not to be frequently used either, even for spacing. There are other options for that. But on CH, it does have good potential.


3K (i13, safe on block; neutral on hit; prevents buffering and may give advantage up to 8-9 frames; option to end in a second K, and an additional B after the second K; 3KK unsafe and gets more unsafe with 3KKK, which has only two moments of impact defined; 3KKB NCC; 3KK NCC)

3K makes Nightmare kick out from his left, and appears to have no really good use other than being a fast mid. However, its uses are deeper than that.

3K prevents opponents from buffering on hit. If they do not know the exact recovery for the earliest possible retaliation, then there is a rather large advantage for Nightmare. Also, 3K has several different enders. This makes it viable as a mix-up.

3KK hits mid then low, and is a NCC. The second hit will sweep the opponent and knock him down. 3KKK also hits twice and there is no different visible states of disadvantage between 3KK and 3KKK.

3KKB is also a NCC. The B follow-up allows the opponent to AC a short distance away. On a standing hit, the B ender induces a CFS.

Thus, 3K becomes a mix-up in its own right. However, it is best to use it by itself, especially on either hit or CH, for the advantage it can give Nightmare. And if opponents do know about the advantage, and continue blocking, 3KK can be a good follow-up.


1_2K (i15, very slightly unsafe on block; RC; very slight advantage on hit; i13 after opponent’s unsafe move)

His only low that is really safe, 1_2K can seem to have little damage on hit, but is fast enough to counter-attack some stuff and is also done in FC position. Therefore, this move can be good even when spammed. It is especially good when it comes down to that little bit of blood and all you need is a 1_2K to finish him off. Mix up with a mid-fake option and then just hit him with that tiddly little kick to do him in.


4K (i15, unsafe on block; neutral on hit; option to go into 4KK, unsafe on block, very slight advantage on hit)

4K may just seem like another fast counter attack that takes Nightmare a small step forward as it hits. However it has options off finishing a second K, and then going into NBS from there, or simply going into NBS from the first K.

By doing 4[K], Nightmare goes straight into NBS. By doing 4[K]2_8, Nightmare spins in the respective direction (assuming you are on 1P side) then goes into NBS. It is also possible to do 4[K]2_86B, which will make Nightmare spin and then do a b6 move. The second K also has these options. However both K enders are unsafe on block, although 4KK has a very slight advantage on hit. The 6B ender is slightly unsafe on block, though nothing can really punish it, and does not really space as well. Players are best advised to use this move very sparingly.


44K (i36, safe on block; has special in-built moves)

Though a slow move as all hell, 44K does have its uses post-GI and its in-built moves. It also causes a BN on hit, making most of its in-built moves a guarantee on follow-up. Nightmare also takes a step back before doing the move.

The A ender is a basic 3A and therefore has auto-GI abilities, and can be used if you think after blocking 44K, the opponent will throw out a high or mid move (a throw is also possible, that can be auto-GI’ed as well). Enders like 2_8A (basic 33A and 99A respectively) give options to RO to either side of Nightmare. 44K SCC is a good bait for Nightmare to do a 66K CH amongst other fast CH options. If the opponent remains blocking after 44K, the A+B ender can be good to catch people unawares down low (as it is basic 3A+B).


WS K (i14, unsafe on block)

For a fast WS move, WS K is the way to go. Varying this move with WS A can also help when mixing up speed-wise. WS is a little slower than WS K, while WS K instantly knocks down the opponent and leaves Nightmare in prime position for a good okizeme game. However, it should be noted that it is unsafe on block and therefore should be used wisely when mixed up.


22_88K (i20, neutral on block; advantage on hit; option to go into A, AA, A2AA, K and AAB enders)

This move may seem slow and to new players who do not understand, will simply prefer a simple A+K over this move. However, data-wise this move is only a little better than A+K with it’s a ender. With its neutrality on block and its advantage on hit, this makes it a good bait for CH moves.

The A ender is also good and usually preferred over a simple 22_88K. On block it is still safe, and is actually a little advantaged. On hit it has a large advantage for Nightmare. However, players who wise up to the A ender may duck the second A and then punish Nightmare with a WS move. Beware of this.

22_88KAA is a NCC. Try never to end the move at the B. 22_88KA2A is not a NCC. 22_88KK is a NCC and is very slightly advantaged on hit but unsafe on block.


11_77K (i18, safe on block; slight advantage on hit; TC; RO’s in front of Nightmare on CH)

Though at first glance this move looks pretty useless, it does have its uses at the ring’s edge. It takes a step back, TC’s and on CH knocks down the opponent, which at the ring edge means a RO for Nightmare. Another option for him at the edge. It is also safe on block, and on hit creates a little space and very slight advantage for Nightmare.


236K (i21, unsafe on block; can go up to 5 stomps, gets more unsafe with each stomp; option to do a UB-L by holding K, i42)

One of the moves that could have been the reason some players go for Nightmare, the stomp is actually a good option for okizeme at times. It catches rollers and is a NC on grounded opponent for first two hits if he rolls. You can also mix up the number of K’s, and on CH the K induces a FS on a standing opponent. However, the best option is the held K into UB.

With a 236[K], Nightmare does a UB-L that guarantees a 2A+B follow-up. It can become a good option near a wall as well. Even though it is not an infinite, varying and using it with caution can cause problems on wake-up for the opponent.


A+B & A+K Attacks

Nightmare has certain A+B and A+K attacks that can be quite good during combat. It is certainly good to combine these moves with his basic and 8WR moves.


3A+B (i32, unsafe on block; GC-L2)

A long-range low attack for Nightmare, it is perhaps best used at mid-range or after a 4B connects on standing hit, if the opponent does not expect it. It is highly unsafe on block and can be punished very easily at close ranges. This move must be used with extreme caution.

At GC-L2, it becomes a tactical strategy for Nightmare at close-range to use this move. It is however best not to be used in this state at longer ranges because Nightmare has basically nothing fast enough to take advantage of the advantage offered by this state of GC at such a range.


2A+B (i33 ~ i34, unsafe on block; SCUB; hold 2 to remain in grounded state)

Best used as a guaranteed follow-up to 236[K] UB, 2A+B is also an option for a SCUB, thereby adding to Nightmare’s options at a full SC. It leaves Nightmare in grounded state if you hold 2 as you do the move, or you can allow Nightmare to immediately wake up and hit the opponent. 2A+B is also good as a mid-range move and does KND and RO in front of Nightmare. However it is slow and unsafe on block, making it also viable for post-GI games as another option.


A+K (i20, safe on block; advantage on hit)

Faster to execute than 22_88K, its only difference lies in its slightly lesser advantage with the A ender. All other options are as like 22_88K.


8WR A+K (i24 ~ i25, unsafe on block; sweeps opponent; TC)

One of his core moves as well, 8WR A+K sweeps the opponent off his feet and is good for wake-up games. Being a slightly slower low, it could become obvious to the hardened players. However, it is still a good move by itself, allowing great wake-up games. It also has TC properties. This move cannot be used too often, but in a mix-up it is extremely powerful when applied correctly in wake-up games.


Stance Based Attacks

Nightmare would not be complete without his stances, which add more options and a certain degree of flexibility to his playing style. With 5 stances at a player’s disposal, the uses and limitations of each stance must be carefully studied in order to be used most effectively to suit a player’s own playing style.

All of the following speeds are executed when Nightmare is already in the stance for that move.

NBS

NBS K (i10, safe on block; advantage on hit; same move as NBSR K; option to end with another K)

One of two of his fastest stance attacks, NBS K can help bail Nightmare out of in-close lock-down combat, or as a frame trap near a wall or ring edge. It must be used wisely, for its speed cannot afford to be wasted. Yet if you follow-up one NBS K with another, the opponent may attempt to GI in order to put the situation in his favor. NBS K leaves Nightmare still in NBS.

NBS K can end with another K, which is a NC and kicks the opponent to about mid-range. The second K is vulnerable to i10 A’s. You can use the second K as an additional move should you feel the opponent may not anticipate it. However, using this option too often will definitely leave Nightmare at a disadvantage.


NBS A (i13, safe on block; a few frames TC; held A to go into NSSR, only one hit)

Another good attack from NBS, simply pressing A makes Nightmare swing his sword twice around him, with the first move being a high and the second a mid. Most opponents may not expect the second hit and it spaces on block as well, though only to a small extent.

Holding A roulettes Nightmare into NSSR after the first slash. This could be a good bait for a CH NSSR K, albeit a risky one.


NBS B (i18, safe on block; TC)

Most commonly used as the guaranteed follow-up to 3, NBS B is good as well for hitting on crouching opponents after a stance shift to NBS. On its own, it is safe on block but should always only be used as the guaranteed follow-up only.

There is a chance NBS B hits on CH on the side of the opponent so that a relaunch for Nightmare using 3B is possible.


NBS bA (i29, very unsafe on block and unsafe on hit; NBSR bA same move; can be alternately done as 2A; holding A goes into NSSL)

A low sweep, this move is mixed up with NBS options but is very rarely used for its obvious startup and it being very unsafe on block. Also, rouletting from it brings Nightmare into NSSL, which is inferior to NSSR in certain aspects. Therefore, this move is best used with extreme caution.

NBSR

NBSR B (i37 when done as full command, safe on block; spaces a little; RO’s in front of Nightmare to mid-range)

Hitting mid and launching opponents far from Nightmare, NBSR B is a good RO move. It hits the opponent to about mid-range (a 3 is actually guaranteed while the opponent is in air after being hit), while on block it spaces to a certain degree. It is also good when buffered as part of a rush, but may be a little too obvious at times. This move is best advised to be used when set up properly. It is also a guarantee as an immediate buffer after 33A.


NBSR A (i35, safe on block; advantage on hit, bigger advantage at farther range; option to end with another A,
NCC, unsafe on block; first A held to go into NSSR; first A can be ducked, punished by iWS moves)

A safe move, NBSR A is good even at long-range for its rushing startup. Even though it is a high, it has the option to roulette into NSSR or stop at the first A, and still is completely safe on block, with an advantage on hit.

With an option to end with a second A, NBSR AA can be very good. This high-powered move of Nightmare’s almost guarantees a RO in his favor on CH even some distance away from the ring’s edge, as it is a NCC. It can however be ducked on the second hit if the first is blocked, then punished by iWS moves. It does however cover a large area and is useful when both combatants are rushing at each other.


NLS (NLS has a sort of TC property; it evades all highs, including throws)

NLS B (i15, safe on block, neutral on hit; TC; can be held to go into NBS)

NLS B is good for attacking at mid-range. A rather linear poke with a little tracking ability, it pushes out the opponent whether on block or hit, though the push is of course not as pronounced on block. Holding B goes into NBS, which is quite unsafe since the opponent can attack Nightmare before he is in NBS itself. Thus 2G may not be executed in time. This move is best used at mid-range and as part of a NLS or mid/low mix-up.


NLS A (i26, unsafe on block, advantage on hit; hold A to go into NSSR)

A low hit that sweeps the opponent on CH, NLS A is good for moving into NSSR, baiting an attack by the opponent. This makes it possible for a NSSR K to land on CH. The low hit is good as well for a NLS mix-up, but as it is unsafe on block it is always better to move into NSSR for more options.


NLS K (i22, unsafe on block; auto-GI’s all horizontals; hold K to go into NSSL)

The auto-GI ability of this move makes it a viable move on its own. Hitting mid, this move can also RO in front of Nightmare for a short distance. On hit, an immediate b6, 1K is guaranteed. The auto-GI however only works for horizontals and vertical hits that come downwards from high. Holding K goes into NSSL, which is unsafe by itself already. This move should not go into NSSL unless you are baiting the opponent to allow yourself the chance to land a CH NSSL K, but it is very risky. NLS K by itself must also be used wisely.


NLS A+B (i30, unsafe on block; GC-L1; SCUB; TC; FC; slower startup; evades to a little right of Nightmare)

This move is great for evasion of vertical hits, and its SCUB ability. It is slightly slower on startup, and on hit knocks the opponent some distance away and includes RO potential. Though the evasion is not large, when timed properly NLS A+B can punish an opponent hoping to get a launcher off. With its SCUB property, Nightmare has more options for a full SC as well.

NLS 6B (i22, unsafe on block; GC-L2; TJ)

This is a move that new players are prone to use as well. AA -> NLS -> NLS 6B is actually around 75% damage on all hits. But of course, it can hardly be easily pulled off.

However, NLS 6B does get props for its TJ ability, as well as its GC-L2 ability, making it rather difficult to G2 the last two hits. However, it needs to be set up properly. Doing an instant NLS 6B would be a good idea for escaping a low, but is rather difficult to pull off in actual play and can be harmful if one guesses wrongly.


NSS (The only distinguished moves that are different is each side’s bA move)


NSS K (i10, safe on block; on CH induces a 8-frame DOS, the only one of its kind in the game)

NSS K is best known for its 8-frame DOS on CH. This particular DOS is hard to kick out of even for some experienced veterans, especially when unexpected. It usually leads to a 3B if not broken in time. However, it hits high and therefore can be ducked. Even though it is safe on block, this move is best used when set up properly.

If it hits on CH at the opponent’s side, or a normal hit, the opponent will be kicked away. It RO’s in this way in front of Nightmare.


NSS A (unsafe on block, rather large advantage on hit; option to end with another 2A)

The A hit is best used for its speed and low hit. On hit it leads to a rather large advantage for Nightmare and frame traps for the uninitiated. This can be a strong 2-choice setup for Nightmare, and may fool opponents into thinking that Nightmare is disadvantaged when he is actually not. On block it is unsafe, but it should still be part of a mid/low mix-up. This makes it easier for Nightmare to get a hit for future setups.

This move has another useful ender in 2A. It can be used if the opponent does not expect it. The second move also hits low and RO’s quite far to the left of Nightmare.


NSS (unsafe on block except by 2G; less launch height and damage at far/max range; goes into NBS)

A launcher, NSS is a good move when used as part of a mix-up. It guarantees a NBS B on hit. Unsafe on block except by 2G, this move evades vertical hits that strike just as it starts. Nightmare also has options off NBS attacks after doing this move. When buffered, it is also good since Nightmare spins a lot during the animation and can confuse opponents who are unprepared or unable to take advantage of the situation immediately.


NSS A+B (i29, unsafe on block, advantage on hit; if held goes into alternate NSS, and safe on block with large
advantage on hit; GC-L1)

Hitting mid, this move has a GC-L1 property. On a GC, if the opponent does not attempt to GI or G2, a NSS K (assuming you held A+B, thus going into alternate NSS) is guaranteed. When held, Nightmare goes into the alternate NSS and there is no limit to the number of times you can do this. Unsafe on block, this move is best used with caution and GC-L1 setups, and also when held.


NSSR bA (very unsafe on block; disadvantage on hit; induces a CFS modifier that guarantees a 3 on CH)

A great move for a tactical retreat, NSSR bA spaces to a rather large degree, allowing Nightmare some breathing space. It also takes a step back during startup and thus is actually rather safe, except by AG for some characters. On CH, a CFS modifier results and a free 3 is guaranteed. With the side MGYS variation and then going into this move, Nightmare can create a lot of space for himself in a hurry.


NSSL bA (rather unsafe on block; RO’s to left of Nightmare)

An very unsafe move due to it being a high, this move’s only use would be RO potential on a circling opponent. However there are other better options for a RO to his left, and this move should thus be used very sparingly, if at all.



General Information (Ranges)

This section deals with how Nightmare can fight, be advantaged or be disadvantaged, at different ranges.


Long Range

Range Statistics

Advantage: Talim, Taki, Xianghua, Cassandra, Sophitia, Maxi, Raphael, Mitsurugi, Yunsung, Voldo
On par: Kilik, Astaroth, Cervantes, Yoshimitsu, Seung Mina
Disadvantage: Ivy

Gameplay

At long range, Nightmare definitely has the advantage against aggressive lock-down characters such as Taki and Talim. He has the option to space should such characters attempt to rush in blindly, and can rush for several setups of his own should the need arise. Although he lacks any decent move that can hit at long range, apart from NBSR AA, he can still stall for time with his spacing options at mid-range.

The only character Nightmare definitely loses to at this range is Ivy. Nightmare must close in to mid-range to deal with her. As for Astaroth, his long range moves are slow and obvious and should be GI’ed. A good Astaroth will play the lock-down game instead of the ranged game, and thus Astaroth is not a big threat to Nightmare at this range.

For Cervantes, he has the option to close in real quick with 4B+K, but that is slow, and obvious. Nightmare can either step or GI that on reaction. However, Cervantes does have good rushing options, and this may make it difficult for Nightmare to guess what Cervantes will do from long range, as regards a sudden rush. Kilik plays the mid range game, and thus can actually break any rushing Nightmare’s confidence with a simple mid-ranged move on CH.

Yoshimitsu uses 66B~B+K and other moves to close in, or baits a rush by Nightmare by going into Meditation stance. Thus, Nightmare and Yoshimitsu are about on par. Seung Mina needs to play a mid-ranged game as well.

Possible Moves That May Be Used

NBSR AA
66A
agA
66B
4B(~G)
4A(~G)
1A
44B
NBSR B
NSS A2A
NSSR bA
6B:BB
6B


Mid Range

Range Statistics

Advantage: Ivy, Yoshimitsu, Talim, Taki, Cassandra, Yunsung, Maxi
On par: Sophitia, Raphael, Mitsurugi, Voldo, Xianghua
Disadvantage: Astaroth, Kilik, Cervantes, Seung Mina

Gameplay

At mid range is usually where Nightmare would prefer his opponents to be. With many options available to him at this range, Nightmare can contain the fight within his limits. With both the ability to both space or close in whenever he needs to, a good application of mix-ups and setups can very easily lead to a game in Nightmare’s favor.

His entire arsenal is applicable at mid range except for moves that reach only a very short distance. Nightmare can also stave off rush-down characters but may have difficulty doing so if he reacts too late to their dashes and tactical rushes.

Nightmare loses to Kilik at this range as Kilik is ultimately superior to Nightmare in this aspect. Seung Mina plays nearly the same way and thus Nightmare must know how to close in with these two and not stay within their preferred range of play. Astaroth can own certain Nightmare moves with just 66[A]B alone on CH, and added with Bullrush and 66B, and the sudden rush to a command throw, make Astaroth superior to Nightmare at this range. Cervantes also has an edge against Nightmare with 3A, 33A, 66B and other moves.

Xianghua and Nightmare are about on par at this range. Both characters’ moves need to get the opponent into a so-called circle in order for them to be effective. Mitsurugi, Voldo and Raphael need to play a little of mid range games in order to stave off opponents, though Nightmare may have the edge against all of them. Sophitia remains an enigmatic character with the ability to both space and contain. Nightmare may have difficulty dealing with a few of her moves.

Possible Moves That May Be Used

His entire arsenal is available, except for 66K, 4K, 8WR A+K, and other short-range moves.


Short Range

Range Statistics

Advantage: Astaroth, Seung Mina
On par: Kilik, Ivy, Yunsung
Disadvantage: Maxi, Yoshimitsu, Mitsurugi, Taki (severe), Talim (severe), Xianghua, Voldo, Cervantes, Cassandra, Sophitia, Raphael

Gameplay

Nightmare appears to be very disadvantaged at short-range against most characters, as he lacks a rather varied arsenal of useful short-ranged moves. This can both work for and against Nightmare.

Against characters like Talim and Taki, Nightmare definitely must know how to space with them. Without a certain range, Nightmare will find a certain degree of difficulty in dealing with them efficiently. However, this is definitely not to say that Nightmare cannot fight with them at close-range. Certain moves like 66K (on CH), 6A, 3A, 3K etc, combined with crouch grabs, 1K and 3 whenever possible, make a pit-bull Nightmare live up to his name. This can however be risky if not applied correctly. It is best advised to deal with these two characters in particular at range whenever possible.

Against the other characters, a pit-bull Nightmare may or may not be the formula for victory. However, this is usually up to a player’s style and therefore, the player should not allow the disadvantage Nightmare faces at a short-range to diminish his close-range strategy of a pit-bull Nightmare if he has one.

Possible Moves That May Be Used

6A
agA
66K
3A
4K
6K
3K
1K
3
FC 3A+G
22_88K
8WR A+K



Why Nightmare?

Nightmare is generally painted as a low-tier character for many. He appears to be user-friendly to new folks, has a big ass sword that deals out great damage, but is a little slow in response against faster characters. This is but the tip of the iceberg.

As it can be seen from his data, Nightmare can be a force up close, even with limited options. He has great range, enough spacing options to keep an opponent at that range, and be able to play either an aggressive, or defensive style. Only Ivy is able to reach further than he can; Astaroth is slower at range than Nightmare and his moves are obvious, while Kilik owns at mid-range but may have difficulty dealing with a similarly-ranged character like Nightmare. Thus, Nightmare is, in certain aspects, a good ranged character.

With his five stances and an array of frightening wake-up moves, Nightmare can be a real difficulty when an opponent is grounded, and he is standing. Guessing out of FC/WS mix-ups are bad enough; guessing wake-up games against Nightmare is far worse than that. He has options even when the opponent remains grounded (for example, 4B tracks side-rollers and hits grounded), and upon wake-up opponents have to guess whether they want to block high, block low, GI, or step.

Talking about stances, Nightmare can easily shift stances and be as intimidating as ever. One of his best moves, as we all know already, is NSS K on CH. Fear of that can make them duck, GI, or just block; you can make them pay with other NSS options or a stance shift into something else.

Though Nightmare has a lot of limitations, like having a disadvantage in lock-down situations, as well as the general lack of fast close moves that can actually beat out many options, they can be worked around. There is no absolute way of saying that Nightmare is low-tier just by looking at the way he is played, the way some other characters can outclass him, and the way some people just give up on him. That would be very foolish. Underestimating Nightmare’s ability to punish can leave opponents in a world of hurt even before they realize it.

Nightmare also has a great RO game. At the ring’s edge, his RO game is perhaps at most secondary to Astaroth’s. Kilik also has a great RO game but cannot outdo Nightmare in such an aspect, as he has lesser options than Nightmare. And, Nightmare has that frustratingly good unbreakable AT in 1B; a mistake by the opponent, and 1B will RO him out flat.
Overall, Nightmare is definitely a difficult character to both use and master at higher levels, but that is by no means why he should be maligned, degraded and neglected. He has ranged options, spacing options, hellish RO and wake-up games, and the ability to still be able to kick out of a lock-down situation and make a comeback in any match-up. He is by no means a character to be despised.



Playing As Nightmare

Nightmare, like any other character, can be played in many different ways. How then should one play as him? Here are some suggestions that may or may not be relevant to your style of play. Ultimately though, the way you play him should be the way you think you can win with.


Set A Goal

Setting an aim first for what you want to do in a match is crucial. Do you want to play Nightmare as an aggressive rusher, or a defensive-minded ranger? If you want to play him aggressively, then make sure you know what you can mix up while rushing up to an opponent. Ensure that you know when to stop, when to attack, when to mix up your moves, and when to expect an attack. This may seem very difficult, but everything takes time to develop. If you want to play a defensive-minded Nightmare, then you have to stay away from the fight. Maybe you want to turtle, or maybe you just want to stay at the optimal range of his weapon, and not be dragged into a lock-down situation where you can easily be picked off.


Safe Or Flashy?

This is one of the oldest questions in the book. Every character faces this problem. For Nightmare, how do you want to play him? Safe and effective? If you do that, then you have to stick to only selected moves, and not utilize his entire arsenal. Simple mix-ups that can catch the opponent off-guard will still work, while being safe frame data wise is also good for a waiting Nightmare that likes to bait an attack. But is it really so that when you play a flashy Nightmare, you cannot be effective? Nightmare has quite an arsenal at his disposal; by changing stances at the right time and mixing up more than a few moves he can actually utilize the many options given to him, however limited his playing style may at first seem. Thus, how you wish to play your Nightmare as, is also very important.


Stance Shifting

As can be seen earlier in this FAQ, many Nightmare players have dropped stance shifting due to the need for precise input. However, can it be true that without stance shifting, Nightmare is actually better off? Nightmare has stances for the same reason Mitsurugi has them - they allow the character to input more options at the price of being less safe. Yet, with the 2G bug, and the stance options Nightmare has, how can one say that Nightmare’s stances are not safe? Mixing up stance options, and doing the actual stance shifting can open the way for a baited NSS K on CH, or frame traps for a NBS K, and so on. So, do you want to include stance shifting as part of your playing style? Or do you want to follow the safe rule and give up on stance shifting altogether?


Rouletting

Nightmare is perhaps the best character for rouletting. He has just enough stances and moves that go into stances for him to roulette successfully. Yet, is rouletting really good? For example, NBS [A] -> NSSR, does it guarantee anything? If you think it does, then do it. If not, why bother? Rouletting usually leaves you in a stance and makes you do a move to go into that stance. What if your opponent manages to read you right and GI’s, ducks or blocks whatever move you use, and then punish you? Thus, this is another point to take note of in Nightmare’s style.


Always remember, the way you play your Nightmare must be the way you think you can win with. Never follow others blindly. Think about how you want to play him for yourself, not for others.
 

Dr. Hates

Jerk.
RE: the playguide part, it's worth noting that "unsafe" in reference to moves generally just denotes disadvantage, so don't rely on this guide to tell you whether or not a move is punishable. Also, ignore all commentary about NM being low tier. Talim's a hard counter (and damn near unwinnable matchup), but he can wreck most of the cast.
 

Akilise

[09] Warrior
I tried using nightmare in sc2 but he just doesn't work out with me. The most comfortable character that I use in sc2 is sophitia.
 

KowtowRobinson

[10] Knight
Not a solid strategy or anything but I miss how you could run the fuck up into their face while switching to chief hold. Pretty sure he yelled when he did it too, jerk move lol.
 

SilentWall

[10] Knight
For the correct input of Nightmare's stance G2:
Night Behind Stance / Night Reverse Side Stance / Night Side Stance / Night Lower Stance
[g]2 - works!
[G]2 - works!
[g]25 - works!
[G]25 - works!
[G][2] - works!
[G]+[2] - works!

g2 - Does not work!
G2 - Does not work!
[G]+25 - Does not work if you just tap the 2 too fast (1 frame)!

*** Because you have to activate the G cancel first, then you can input the 2 to activate the guard. Keep holding G will keep the guard ability.
 
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